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Faculty Information Lab Information (Packet Type, Course Title, & Department) Location
Abbott, Geoffrey
Lab Contact:
Geoffrey Abbott
abbottg@uci.edu
(949) 824-3269
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pharmacology
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356A Med Surge II, School of Medicine

Research Description

Areas of research: ion channel physiology and pharmacology, ion transporter physiology and pharmacology, cardiovascular sciences, epithelial cell biology, neurobiology, drug discovery. Central themes: understand the role of ion channels and transporters in normal function of excitable and non-excitable cells, and in diseases of the heart, brain, skeletal muscle and epithelia. Develop novel therapeutics to treat ion channel and transporter-related diseases. Disorders currently studied: cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, periodic paralysis, hypothyroidism. Students will have opportunity to participate in experiments covering all aspects of pharmacological and physiological research: molecular (cloning) and cellular (cell culture) biology, pharmacology (electrophysiological assays of drug effects), ion channel and transporter structure-function combining site-directed mutagenesis and cellular electrophysiology, and animal behavior.

Requirements to Participate

students interested in pharmacological/physiological research; commitment: 2 years or more. Preference to those with experience in molecular biology and/or physiology.

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hours/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

participation, willingness to learn, responsibility
Acharya, Munjal
Lab Contact:
Munjal Acharya
macharya@uci.edu
949-824-9183
A NEURAL STEM CELLS
Department: SOM - Radiation Oncology
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Medical Sciences A (Bldg 811)

Research Description

Neural stem cells, neurobiology of cancer therapy-induced decline in neural stem cells and cognitive function, epigenetic regulation of radiation-induced brain injury

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit
Afghani, Behnoosh
Lab Contact:
Behnoosh Afghani
bafghani@uci.edu
(714) 456-5726
B HEALTH
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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UCIMC, 101 City Drive, Bldg 58, Orange, CA 92868

Research Description

Research in different areas related to A) Infection prevention, including hand hygiene compliance in healthcare workers and surveillance of hospital acquired infections through chart studies, B) Mentorship: Needs of students for mentorship will be assessed and the information will be used to guide planning, implementation, evaluation, and decision making to develop mentorship programs related to the field of healthcare. Projects will be conducted at the UCI Medcial Center.

Requirements to Participate

Students must complete requirements for human subject research and Biosafety 194 and Research Ethics course and have strong analytical and social skills. Students must be in their junior or senior years. Familiarity with the Excel program will be helpful.

Grade Point Average

3.0 is required

Time Commitment per Week

3-4 hours per week is required but the hours can be spread throughout the week. Students can continue the project throughout the year and get units each quarter.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Commitment and enthusiasm in finishing assignments and helping with data analysis.
Agalliu, Dritan
Lab Contact:
Dritan Agalliu
A BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Agrawal, Anshu
Lab Contact:
Anshu Agrawal
aagrawal@hs.uci.edu
(949) 824-7706
A IMMUNOLOGY
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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Med Sci I, C-238

Research Description

he focus of my lab is to understand the biology of dendritic cells (DC) of the immune system. DCs are the major antigen presenting cells that are critical mediators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. We are mainly interested in understanding the differences in the functioning of DCs between young and aged human subjects and the consequences and mechanisms underlying these differences. We study the activation of DCs by Toll like receptors (TLRs) ligands by Flow cytometry and ELISA. Signaling differences are studies by Western and flow cytometry. The priming of T cells by DCs forms a major component of our adaptive immune system studies.

Grade Point Average

3.5+

Time Commitment per Week

12-15 hrs/wk
Ahlering, Thomas
Lab Contact:
Linda Huynh
lindamh@hs.uci.edu
(714) 456-7354
B PROSTATE CANCER
Department: SOM - Urology
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UCI Medical Center, City Tower 333 City Blvd West, Ste 2100 Orange, CA 92868

Requirements to Participate

Major in the Biology Department At least a third year undergraduate

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Two to three days a week. 12-16 hours per week; training period 15-20 hours per week.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, database upkeep, and quality of work.
Aizik, Shlomit
Lab Contact:
Shlomit Aizik
saizik@uci.edu
(949) 824-2584
B EXERCISE MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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1. The Pediatric Exercise and Genomics Research Center (PERC) 101 Academy, Suite 150 2. PERC-Functional Genomics Lab UCI Medical Center, Building 55, 3rd floor. 3. Main Campus and Community Sites

Research Description

Areas of research are in functional genomics and exercise physiology and include: immune system and muscle genomic and epigenetic responses to exercise, effects of exercise and training during childhood and adolescence, effects of exercise and training on children with chronic disease and children with special needs.

Requirements to Participate

Students interested in exercise physiology and/or genomics. Good organizational and communication skills, reliability and enthusiasm.

Grade Point Average

GPA>3.0

Time Commitment per Week

6-15 hours/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Reliability, ability to communicate, hours completed, quality of work and progress in research skills.
Akbari, Yama
Lab Contact:
Yama Akbari
yakbari@uci.edu
(949) 824-1888
A NEURO-CRITICAL CARE
Department: SOM - Neurology
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Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility.

Research Description

Dr. Akbari is a physician scientist who focuses on neuro-intensive care using basic science, translational, and clinical approaches. The goal of the lab is to discover ways to optimize recovery from coma and eventually apply these discoveries towards helping humans who suffer from coma in the neurologic and neurosurgical intensive care unit. The lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to investigate coma in animals using principles of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while monitoring and modifying brain activity, in-vivo physiology, and behavioral outcome. In-vivo and in-vitro techniques in the laboratory incorporate surgical implantation of brain monitoring electrodes into rats, electrophysiology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and pharmacologic manipulation, immunohistochemistry and histology. Moreover, basic cell and molecular biology techniques utilizing DNA, RNA, and protein isolation/analysis will be implemented. Lastly, for students with competency or interests in bio-engineering, computer programming, coding, and/or an understanding of MATLAB, projects involving signal processing are available in the laboratory. This is an opportunity to join a laboratory from the ground up as it is newly formed and growing. It is located in the Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility, the premier neuroscience building at the School of Medicine and main campus. The lab is interested in attracting highly motivated and enthusiastic students who are devoted to working hard under supervision within a supportive atmosphere. Students will be encouraged to present their research at local undergraduate research conferences. Highly motivated and devoted students will have the opportunity for co-authorship on publications.

Requirements to Participate

Bio 194S (required). Also recommended but not required: neuroscience or neurobiology courses, general chemistry.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 8-12 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort and quality of work, self-initiative and dedication to work, proper lab safety protocols.
Allison, Steve
Lab Contact:
Steve Allison
allisons@uci.edu
(949) 824-2341
A MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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3108 Bio Sci 3

Research Description

My lab works at the interface between microbiology, ecosystem ecology, and global change. We study how microbes ?make a living? in the environment, and how they affect ecosystem processes, such as the break-down of dead plant material and the cycling of nutrients. Student projects may focus on field work, laboratory studies, and/or computer modeling. Summer and academic year positions are available.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be prepared to develop independent projects and spend at least 10 hours per week on research. A multi-quarter commitment is strongly preferred, and students will be expected to participate in lab activities and meetings. To apply for a position, please visit http://allison.bio.uci.edu , download the Bio 199 Research Application form, and send the form back to allisons@uci.edu.

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

grades will be based on time committed to the project and the quality of research
Andersen, Bogi
Lab Contact:
Shuman Liu
shumanl@uci.edu
(949) 824-9372
A ENDOCRINOLOGY/CANCE
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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Sprague Hall 250

Research Description

The overall objective of our research is to gain understanding into how organ development is controlled and how it relates to epithelial diseases. Specifically, we are interested in how transcription factors -- these are proteins that bind to genes and regulate their expression -- control organ formation and function. REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: Background in biology and interest in gene expression.

Requirements to Participate

Background in biology and interest in gene expression

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hrs.wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, following appropriate lab and university-mandated safety protocols, initiative and overall enthusiasm for research.
Anderson, Aileen
Lab Contact:
Aileen Anderson
aja@uci.edu
(949) 824-6750
A ANATOMY
Department: SOM - Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
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845 Health Science Road, 2030 Sue & Bill Gross Hall.

Research Description

Dr. Anderson is an Associate Professor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Anatomy & Neurobiology, with 20 years of research experience focusing on the mechanisms and pathways of central nervous system degeneration and regeneration. She is a member of the Stem Cell Research Center, Reeve-Irvine Research Center, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, and Center for Immunology at the University of California at Irvine. In addition to her laboratory at UCI, she is the Director of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Foundation (CDRF) Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Research Core Facility, and a part of the CDRF International Consortium on Spinal Cord Injury. The CDRF SCI Core was established in 2001 as the first foundation-funded initiative of its kind, with the goal of enabling interdisciplinary and cross-institutional access to SCI animal models and training as an integral part of multiple CDRF research initiatives. Dr. Anderson's own research is focused on two principal goals. First, investigating the interactions of transplanted stem cell populations within the injured niche, including the role of the evolving inflammatory microenvironment in stem cell fate and migration decisions. Second, investigating the role of inflammatory mechanisms in degeneration and regeneration in the injured CNS, particularly the role of the innate immune response and complement pathways in these conflicting but intertwined processes. Much of the research in Dr. Anderson's laboratory bridges the junction between seeking to understand mechanism at the basic neuroscience level, and identifying translational neuroscience strategies to ameliorate the cellular and histopathological deficits associated with SCI to promote recovery of function.

Requirements to Participate

Attendance of Lab Meetings at least 1 qtr per year Completion of assigned lab safety training. On the last day of instruction of both the fall and winter quarter, students are required to turn in a 1-2 page summary of work completed. This can include background information obtained by reading the literature, details about a technique learned, and/or data generated. At the end of spring quarter, this paper will be replaced with a 15-minute scientific talk presented to the lab. All 199s are required to attend these talks.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, following appropriate lab and university-mandated safety protocols, initiative and overall enthusiasm for research.
Andrade, Rosa
Lab Contact:
Rosa Andrade
rmandra1@uci.edu
949-824-6320
A TOXOPLASMOSIS
Department: Medicine-Infectious Diseases
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MedSci C

Research Description

There are at least 2656 reported cases of children born with abnormally small brains (microcephaly) due to Zika virus to this date. Sadly, there are many more pathogens, such as Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus (collectively known as TORCH), causing similar devastating brain congenital malformations. Even more, we know very little about how these pathogens affect developing fetuses. In my lab, we are interested in evaluating how a fetal-pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, causes brain abnormalities at different stages. A suitable animal model to explore the effects of the interaction between the developing embryo and T.gondii is the chicken embryo. Although the chicken embryo is not a mammal, its contributions to our knowledge of developmental biology and immunology have been monumental. In fact, the chicken embryo model led to the discovery of B and T cells, the pillars of cellular immunity. We developed a chicken embryo model of T. gondii infection. This model is generated by injecting the parasite directly into the chorioallantoic vessel. Chicken embryos are monitored daily by transillumination. Upon termination of the experiment, specimens are harvested for further analysis. We are interested in evaluating organ morphology, parasite load, and inflammatory reaction in this model of congenital toxoplasmosis.

Requirements to Participate

2 year commitment

Grade Point Average

3.8

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety). Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions, and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through).
Anton-culver, Hoda
Lab Contact:
Hoda Anton-culver
hantoncu@uci.edu
(949) 824-7416
B EPIDEMIOLOGY-MED
Department: SOM - Epidemiology
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224 Irvine Hall, Zot 7550

Research Description

Hoda Anton-Culver, PhD.focuses her research in the area of genetic epidemiology of cancer. One study funded by the NCI as an R01 combines techniques in genetic epidemiology and molecular genetics to define and characterize inherited breast/ovarian cancer in the population and in the familial component of the disease. This study began in the late 1980?s and continues to date through competing renewals of the NCI funding. Another NCI funded R01, focuses on colon and rectum cancers to study the effects of genetic influence on the mismatch repair genes as they interact with diet, physical activity, and other factors that may influence the risk for colorectal cancer and estimate genetic and environmental interaction. In addition to breast and colorectal cancer she has funding to investigate genetic and environmental influences on the risk of multiple other cancers including prostate, malignant melanoma and childhood cancer. She has been awarded several significant awards in cancer genetics from the National Cancer Institute. These awards include the (1) "UCI-UCSD Cancer Genetics Network" to collaborate with other centers to investigate the genetic basis of human cancer susceptibility and identify means to address the public health issues associated with human cancer genetics; (2) The "NCI Cancer Genetics Network Informatics Center at UCI" supports the cooperative of Cancer Genetics Networks as the sole Informatics Center responsible for the design, implementation, and maintenance of an information management system that supports the Network-wide research protocols

Requirements to Participate

At least 2 courses in Biology, Genetics, Statistics, and Epidemiology

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Practical, oral and written evaluation.
Arora, Kavita
Lab Contact:
Kavita Arora
A MOLEC DEV BIOL
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Aswad, Dana
Lab Contact:
Dana Aswad
A NEUROCHEMISTRY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Atwood, Scott
Lab Contact:
Scott Atwood
satwood@uci.edu
(949) 824-4346
A SKIN BIOLOGY
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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4340 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

The goals of our research are to understand cell fate decisions in skin cancer, skin and hair follicle development, and stem cells. REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: Background in biology, motivation to carry out research in a thorough and safe manner, fulfillment of time commitment, clear verbal and written communication skills, maintenance of a complete lab notebook that allows the work to be reproduced, attendance at lab group meetings and journal clubs, and enthusiasm to participate in a supportive lab team.

Requirements to Participate

Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, following appropriate lab and safety protocols, initiative and enthusiasm, maintenance of a complete lab notebook, attendance at lab group meetings and journal clubs.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 4 units. 1 year Commitment.
Avise, John
Lab Contact:
Andrew Furness
afurness@uci.edu
949-824-3925
A FISH VIVIPARITY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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steinihaus hall

Research Description

the student will survey the scientific literature on the live-bearing phenomenon (viviparity) in fishes, and then compile the information into a large dataset that will be used in conjunction with a fish phylogeny to understand the evolutionary histories of the piscine placenta.

Requirements to Participate

1 year Commitment.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Faculty Means of Evaluation

attendance at lab meetings, completeness of the literature survey, assistance in compiling and interpreting the data.
Ayala, Francisco
Lab Contact:
Francisco Ayala
A POP & EVOL GENETICS
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
Azizi, Manny
Lab Contact:
Manny Azizi
eazizi@uci.edu
(949) 824-7414
A MUSCLES & MOVEMENT
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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McGaugh 5409

Research Description

Research in the Azizi Lab is focused on understanding the physiology and function of the musculoskeletal system. This work aims to elucidate how the basic properties of muscle cells ultimately limit an animal's maximum performance. This research spans multiple levels of biological organization and independent research projects may focus on in vitro studies of muscle tissue or mechanical studies of animal movement.

Requirements to Participate

Strong interest in physiology. Comfortable working with animals. A multi-quarter commitment preferred. Students are expected to participate in weekly lab meetings.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of research
Baram, Tallie Z.
Lab Contact:
Tallie Baram
tallie@uci.edu
(949) 824-1131, (949) 824-1063
A ANATOMY-NEURO
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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Medical Sciences 1, B151

Research Description

We are a neuroscience research lab, especially interested in the development of epilepsy and the effects of early life stress on brain development. We focus on trying to predict and prevent prevent the development of epilepsy, including research on childhood febrile seizures and how the normal brain becomes epileptic. Additionally, we focus on how early life stress affects learning and memory and how early enrichment can enhance cognitive outcomes. Some of the techniques used in our lab are mouse and rat models, EEG, MRI, in vitro hippocampal and hypothalamic slice culture, live multiphoton imaging of neuron dendrites and spines, epigenetics (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP], RNA seq, gene network analysis), molecular biology (qPCR, In Situ Hybridization, microRNA), and cognitive and behavioral tasks.
Bardwell, Lee
Lab Contact:
Lee Bardwell
A SIGNALING PATHWAYS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Benavente, Claudia
Lab Contact:
Claudia Benavente
claudia.benavente@uci.edu
949-824-7845
A CANCER EPIGENETICS
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences
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Sprague Hall B200

Research Description

The Benavente Lab research interests focus on understanding pediatric solid tumors and contributing to their targeted therapeutics. Our research aims to understand the chromatin remodeling processes that establish the normal epigenetic landscape in developing tissue, how it can be perturbed to promote carcinogenesis, and provide insight for the development of new therapies. Through the study of the epigenetic landscape of retinoblastoma and osteosarcoma, our laboratory hopes to determine why some cell types are more susceptible to tumor formation than other cell types, in particular following RB1 inactivation. We aim to elucidate the role of epigenetics and genome instability in tumorigenesis and how the RB/E2F pathway participates in this process. The use of integrative analyses to study the changes in chromatin organization and gene expression that occur during tumorigenesis will help us identify potential novel therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 4 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20 Pts. Lab Work: 40 Pts. Communication: 20 Pts. Lab citizenship: 20 Pts. Total: 100 Pts.
Benmohamed, Lbachir
Lab Contact:
Lbachir Benmohamed
lbenmoha@uci.edu
(949) 824-8937
A OPHTHALMOLOGY
Department: SOM - Ophthalmology
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Hewitt Hall, Building 843, 2nd Floor

Research Description

Immunology of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1 Latency and Pathogenesis The aim of this study is listed in three sections: 1) To develop a clinically acceptable vaccine strategy to reduce or eliminate ocular and genital herpes infection including recurrent disease. 2) Eventually, the candidate vaccines developed in mice will be tested in rabbits and humans. Techniques used in this project: Immunology, virology, and molecular biology - techniques that include vaccine studies in animal models. 3) To investigate if (1) LAT is involved in dendritic cells (DC) modulation (2) HSV-1 interferes with the migratory activity of DC in vivo (trafficking or homing), (3) LAT also plays a role in this viral activity. Development of immunotherapeutic and immunoprophylactic strategies against various cancers 1) The aim of this study is to develop a clinically acceptable Glyco lipopeptide vaccines to reduce or eliminate tumor cells 2) The candidate vaccines developed will be tested in mouse model of cancers. Techniques used in this project: Immunology, virology, and molecular biology - techniques that include vaccine studies in animal models.

Requirements to Participate

General background in biology/biochemistry/immunology/virology, oncology and/or infectious diseases. Strong motivation, good organizational skills, quick study and receptive to taking work direction. COURSE COMPLETION: Completion of core through Bio 99 with a grade of B or higher, completion of Bio 194S Safety, consent of instructor.

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Time Commitment per Week

20 hrs/wk
Bera, Rimal
Lab Contact:
Rimal Bera
rbera@uci.edu
(714) 456-6898
B PSYCHIATRY
Department: SOM - Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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Community Clinics in Garden Grove and Anaheim. And independent work at their home also.

Research Description

Students will get an opportunity for exposure to community psychiatry. They will have direct patient care where they will administer clinical rating scales to patients, be involved in direct evaluations of the patients and be able to gather data for poster, paper or meeting submission. Students will also be assigned projects where they will perform literature searches to gather data that will be used to improve outcomes in clinical care and develop new treatment programs. These projects will be designed toward the development of more cost effective treatment that result in improved outcomes in clinical care.The research and clinical experience will take place at Community Psychiatric Settings in the city of Garden Grove and Anaheim. Thus transportation will be necessary. Students will be responsible for behaving in a most professional manner as they will function as part of the treatment team. They will be involved in direct evaluation of patients. Outside of the clinic they will be gathering medical literature based on projects they are assigned. The work load will be approximately 8 hours per week. Much independent activity will be necessary on the students part.

Grade Point Average

3.25

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Enthusiasm in working with other members of the treatment team. Observation of professional behavior. Ability to creatively gather literature and summarizing the data with regards to creating new clinical treatments.
Bernard, Hans
Lab Contact:
Hans Bernard
hbernard@uci.edu
(949) 824-5162
A PAPILLOMAVIRUS
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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114 Sprague Hall

Research Description

Induction of cervical carcinoma and other types of cancers by papillomaviruses. Specifically regulation of papillomavirus transcription during the normal life cycle and during carcinogenesis

Requirements to Participate

Preferentially 3rd/4th year student, knowledge about transcription, virology, cell biology

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum of 8 hours (1 full day or 2 half days) plus participation in group seminar (normally Wednesday at noon)
Berns, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Berns
mwberns@uci.edu
(949) 824-6291
A CELL BIOLOGY/LASER
Department: SOM - Surgery
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N/A

Research Description

The Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory of Professor Michael W. Berns is looking for an enthusiastic junior for a bio-199 position to join the cancer-aging telomere project. The goal of this project is to understand the effects of laser damage and study the different signaling pathways on telomeres. In addition, there are opportunities for students to work on laser manipulation of neurons, and other aspects of laser manipulation of cells.

Requirements to Participate

Lab experience/course is a plus and must be interested in pursuing a career in the Health Sciences. Please send your CV to Professor Michael W. Berns.

Grade Point Average

3.3+

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/week
Bhatia, Nitin
Lab Contact:
Nitin Bhatia
bhatian@uci.edu
(714) 456-1699
B SPINE SURGERY
Department: Orthopaedic Surgery
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UCI Medical Center, Pavillion III 2nd floor

Research Description

Patient reported outcomes govern the future of healthcare. How does one enhance the quality of care, increase surgery success, and reduce complications? Patient feedback allows healthcare providers access to patient data before and after an operative procedure. By administering surveys on iPads to patients in the outpatient clinic, patient responses are submitted to an online database where the data can be readily and easily extracted for analysis. Students will be assigned at least two shifts per week with each shift spanning the course of four hours. Students will be asked to sign into the upstairs front desk at Pavilion 3 at the UC Irvine Medical Center, check out a department iPad, and begin surveying patients at their assigned clinic.

Requirements to Participate

Students must also have transportation to UC Irvine Medical Center and be able to sustain two shifts per week. Typical shifts last four hours from 8:00am to 12:00pm and from 1:00pm to 5:00pm in Pavilion 3 at UC Irvine Medical Center.

Grade Point Average

2.5

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 3 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be determined by attendance and quality of data collections conducted.
Billimek, John
Lab Contact:
John Billimek
B DIABETES
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A
Blumberg, Bruce
Lab Contact:
Bruce Blumberg
blumberg@uci.edu
(949) 824-8573
A VERTEBRAE DEV SIGNL
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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4351 Natural Sciences 2.

Research Description

Our research focuses on the role of nuclear hormone receptors in embryonic development, adult physiology and human diseases such as obesity, cancer, inflammation and aging. Nuclear hormone receptors are ligand modulated transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of target genes. Students will gain experience in a broad range of research techniques including molecular biology, biochemistry, developmental biology, cell biology, cancer biology, molecular endocrinology, and genomics. Students beginning in summer and continuing through the year will be given preference, however, starting at any time in the academic year is possible for outstanding students if space is available. Students can visit the laboratory web site for more information. Previous students have published in major scientific journals and in the UCI Undergraduate Research Journal. Please contact Dr. Blumberg directly if you are interested.

Requirements to Participate

Generally speaking, completion of the first 2 years of the Bio Sci core is required. Exceptions have occasionally been made in the past for highly qualified and motivated students. COURSE COMPLETION: BioSci core through at least Bio 98. D103 and D104 are often helpful but not required. The possibility of a second year is advantageous as this will allow the student to undertake an independent research project. OTHER: Students in the lab are strongly encouraged to participate in the Excellence in Research Program, the University Research Opportunity Program (UROP) and the Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP).

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

The nature of our research requires a time commitment of at least 20 hours per week
Blurton-jones, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Matthew Blurton-jones
A NEURAL STEM CELLS
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Bode, Hans
Lab Contact:
Hans Bode
A CELL DIFFERENT
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
View Details Close Info    
N/A
Boiko, Alexander
Lab Contact:
Alexander Boiko
aboiko@uci.edu
949-824-9953
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Mol Biology and Biochem
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3134 Gross Hall

Research Description

Research description: Our Lab is interested in understanding cellular and molecular origins of melanoma initiation and clonal progression, as well as determining factors underlying aggressive metastatic properties of this disease. We are using gene expression analysis to pinpoint signaling networks that are circumvented during normal development or regeneration of melanocytic lineages and result in malignant melanoma transformation. Using RNA inhibition and cDNA overexpression approaches we modulate expression of the candidate genes in target cell populations that are then assayed for their tumorigenic properties in-vitro and in-vivo.

Grade Point Average

3.4

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 4 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 15Pts. Lab Work: 70Pts. Communication: 15Pts.
Borrelli, Emiliana
Lab Contact:
Emiliana Borrelli
A MOLEC NEUROBIOLOGY
Department: Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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N/A
Bota, Daniela
Lab Contact:
Daniela Bota
dbota@uci.edu
(714) 456-7032
A BRAIN TUMORS
Department: SOM - Neurology
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Sprague Hall, B 200

Research Description

1. Translational Research: There is an unmet clinical need for the therapy of malignant gliomas with a median survival of <12 months despite available treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relays on DNA damage and disruption of mitotic machinery, with limited effect in prolonging patient survival. The focus of my research is to test novel agents, in an attempt to target downstream molecular mechanisms involved in tumor growth and resistance to apoptosis. The final goal is to provide scientific bases for clinical trials in patients with newly-diagnoses and recurrent malignant gliomas. 2. Clinical and Quality of Life Research: The main purpose of this study is to conduct a retrospective and prospective chart review to examine associations between care plan timelines and demographic variables in a large clinic sample of patients with brain tumors. Our research aims are to (1) compute correlations among the different variables and determine the average delay of care for Spanish speaking only patients versus native English speaking patients and (2) to test if a patient navigator can improve the access to care for brain tumor patients resulting in a decrease in time from diagnosis to treatment.

Requirements to Participate

Motivation and interest in conducting research in both clinical and laboratory setting. Prior laboratory experience desired for the translational research.

Grade Point Average

3.4

Time Commitment per Week

Would prefer at least 15-20 hours/week over 3 days every week.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Research presentation at the end of rotation, participation in lab meetings, commitment and professionalism.
Bowler, Peter
Lab Contact:
Peter Bowler
pabowler@uci.edu
A REST, SUST &BIOFUEL
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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UCI Arboretum
Bracken, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Matthew Bracken
m.bracken@uci.edu
949-824-6976
A Marine Biodiversity
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
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Steinhaus Hall 494, local field sites on the Orange County coastline

Research Description

Biodiversity is changing at an unprecedented rate on both global and local scales, and we seek to understand the causes and consequences of these changes. Research in the Marine Biodiversity Lab involves a combination of laboratory and field research to understand how marine biodiversity is changing, with a particular focus on local rocky shores, and the consequences of those changes for the structure and dynamics of ecological communities and the transformation and flux of energy and matter in ecosystems. Students will assist with ongoing research in the lab group and initiate an independent research project related to marine ecology.

Requirements to Participate

Submission of CV and description of complementary research interests to Prof. Bracken via email to m.bracken@uci.edu, followed by an interview process to select students to participate in our research.

Grade Point Average

minimum 3.0.

Time Commitment per Week

4 hours / week per credit earned. Participation requires a minimum 8-hour (2 unit) commitment; NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED: 2-5

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Evaluation will be based on participation and on the development of an independent research project, to include a written and oral presentation on the project at the end of the quarter.
Bradley, Timothy
Lab Contact:
Timothy Bradley
tbradley@uci.edu
(949) 824-8483
A Insect Physiology
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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5354 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

The UCI Salton Sea Initiative is a campus wide initiative seeking to address long term sustainability issues in the Salton Sea region. This year we will be partnering with California State Parks to present an environmental education program focused on the biology and ecology of the Salton Sea Basin. We are seeking undergraduate researchers to assist with this program. The course will consist of three lectures provided by Dr. Timothy Bradley, and three trips to the Salton Sea area to participate as counselors in the State Parks Science Camp.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be prepared to travel to the Salton Sea up to 3 times, departing Fridays evenings and returning Saturday evenings. We will provide transportation. Students will be assisting UCI faculty and CA State Parks personnel in program science education, and the teaching of the natural history of the Salton Sea region. Students must be willing to work with school-age children.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be based on time committed to the project and quality of performance.
Bredy, Timothy
Lab Contact:
Timothy Bredy
tbredy@uci.edu
(949) 824-3152
A EPIGENETIC MECH MEM
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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102 Bonney Research Lab

Research Description

Students will perform laboratory experiments to elucidate epigenetic mechanisms underlying memory. This will include behavioral studies mice along with advanced molecular techniques including chromatin immunoprecipitation and qPCR based approaches.
Brenner, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Matthew Brenner
mbrenner@uci.edu, mahonsb@uci.edu
(949) 824-3924, (949) 824-3924
A CLINICAL OCT APPS
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A

Research Description

The laboratory performs translational research to investigate the potential clinical uses of two new technologies: 1) optical coherence tomography (OCT) for diagnosis and management of airway cancer and toxic inhalation injury, and 2) diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for the real time assessment of tissue oxygenation and other relevant physiological parameters in critical care monitoring.

Requirements to Participate

Biological Sciences/Biomedical Engineering or related students.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Evaluation will be made based on student's reliability and enthusiasm, as well as their completion of reading assignments, literature searches and help in design and completion of research activities
Brenner, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Sari Mahon
mbrenner@uci.edu, mahonsb@uci.edu
(949) 824-3924
B CLIN OCT
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A

Research Description

The laboratory performs translational research to investigate the potential clinical uses of two new technologies: 1) optical coherence tomography (OCT) for diagnosis and management of airway cancer and toxic inhalation injury, and 2) diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for the real time assessment of tissue oxygenation and other relevant physiological parameters in critical care monitoring.

Requirements to Participate

Biological Sciences/Biomedical Engineering or related students.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

4

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Evaluation will be made based on student's reliability and enthusiasm, as well as their completion of reading assignments, literature searches and help in design and completion of research activities.
Briscoe, Adriana
Lab Contact:
Adriana Briscoe
abriscoe@uci.edu
(949) 824-1118
A MOL EVOL PHYSIOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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McGaugh 5428

Research Description

Research positions are available to work on a number of projects related to studying the evolution and functional characterization of opsin genes in butterflies. Students will have the opportunity to learn molecular biological techniques such as PCR, cloning and sequencing, and after such techniques are mastered, will be encouraged to develop an independent project in their second year

Requirements to Participate

Mandatory lab meeting attendance, written summary of research progress at the end of each quarter.

Grade Point Average

3.3+

Time Commitment per Week

9-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Successful acquisition of experimental data and lab meeting attendance.
Brown, Donald
Lab Contact:
Donald Brown
dbrown@uci.edu
(949) 824-8936
A OPHTHALMOLOGY
Department: SOM - Ophthalmology
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Hewitt Hall, Building 843, 2nd Floor

Research Description

Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) represents a serious and growing health problem accounting for ~12% of global blindness. Studies have identified age, ancestral group (racial background), and intra-ocular pressure (IOP) as significant risk factors for the development and progression of POAG. The objective of our research is to define the 3 dimensional biomechanical properties of the optic nerve head (ONH ) by microscopically reconstructing the structural components and biomechanical properties and relate these properties to POAG risk factors. In our lab, state of the art technologies to globally assess the three dimensional structure and mechanical properties of the ONH are used. These technologies utilize non-linear optical affects that occur when photons generated by ultrafast lasers interact with tissue and include: 1) two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), and 2) second harmonic generation (SHG). SHG and TPEF allow us to selectively and specifically visualize and quantify collagen (SHG) and elastic fibers (TPEF) within the 3D space of unfixed and unstained ONH tissue. This allows direct study of the effects of pressure on the structural organization of the ONH and LC. Additionally, semi-automated array tomography is used to 3 dimensionally reconstruct the entire ONH at high resolution and volumetrically measure the collagen and elastin distribution and content within the LC.

Requirements to Participate

General biology, physics, and a willingness to learn.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 4 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Laboratory notebook, participation in lab meetings/discussions, participation in UROP undergraduate research day.
Bryant, Peter
Lab Contact:
Peter Bryant
pjbryant@uci.edu
(949) 933-9654
A GENETICS AND DEVEL
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Students will identify and work on projects as part of a comprehensive effort to photodocument and monitor local biodiversity, emphasizing terrestrial invertebrates (insects and spiders), and marine invertebrates (zooplankton). Projects include field studies of the distribution, seasonality and abundance of these animals, as well as studies of their life cycles. The resulting data are being used to build a comprehensive web site showing the diversity, life history, ecological roles, and conservation issues concerning these animals as well as plants and other organisms. A specific region of mitochondrial DNA, called the ?DNA Barcode? is being used for matching adult animals with larval stages, and for species identification as part of the International Barcode of Life Project.

Requirements to Participate

Some knowledge of or at least interest in local natural history. ? Some knowledge of or at least interest in macrophotography and photomicroscopy. ? Willing to do unsupervised field work after training is completed. ? 2-page proposal during the first two weeks of the quarter ? 5-page report due at the end of Finals Week.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/week
Buchmeier, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Buchmeier
A VIRAL PATHOGENESIS
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A
Bunney, William
Lab Contact:
David Walsh
dwalsh@uci.edu
(949) 824-5013
A PSYCHATRY ON CAMPUS
Department: SOM - Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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Main Campus _ 5251 California Ave, Suite 160, Irvine, CA

Research Description

This project is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to examine genetic, architectural, and biochemical brain abnormalities in major depression, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. This opportunity would be appropriate for students interested in research of severe mental illnesses. Students would develop a clear understanding of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, risk factors for suicide and general research methodology. Students are needed on an ongoing basis.

Requirements to Participate

Motivation and interest in clinical research.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

6 to 10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality and quantity of work.
Bunney, William
Lab Contact:
Julie Patterson
jvpatter@uci.edu
(714) 456-1663
B PSYCHATRY AT UCIMC
Department: SOM - Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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UCI Medical Center

Research Description

This research is using brain function (electroencephalogram or EEG), neuropsychological (tests of memory, attention, reaction time, etc.), symptom, and clinical interview measures to study the contribution of brain inhibitory mechanisms and information processing deficits to the symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (manic depression). The students will have the opportunity to have direct patient contact by helping with patient interviews and testing. The research is done at the UCI Medical Center. Students are needed on an ongoing basis.

Requirements to Participate

Motivation and interest in clinical research.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

6 to 10 hr/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Enthusiasm of effort and completion of assigned work.
Burley, Nancy
Lab Contact:
Nancy Burley
A BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
Busciglio, Jorge
Lab Contact:
Jorge Busciglio
jbuscigl@uci.edu
(949) 824-9075
A NEUROBIO
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

Opportunity for 199 students to participate in ongoing research on the molecular bases of neuronal dysfunction and death in Down's syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our research focuses on three areas: 1- Cellular and molecular correlates of mental retardation and progression of AD in DS, including the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the disease process; 2- Molecular mechanisms of A? synaptotoxicity; and 3- Axonal transport deficits in DS and AD neuropathology. Specific training: Trainees gain experience in cell culture methods, image analysis, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore or Junior standing

Grade Point Average

3.4 GPA (this may be negotiable).

Time Commitment per Week

Dedication of at least 10-12 hours per week is required.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Evaluation and grades are based on student's reliability, enthusiasm and completion of research
Cahalan, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael D. Cahalan
mcahalan@uci.edu
949-824-7776
A IMMUNOLOGY
Department: Physiology & Biophysics
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285 Irvine Hall

Research Description

Our laboratory investigates motility and activation of T lymphocytes at the single cell level by imaging and by patch-clamp electrophysiology.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance (20 points). Lab meeting presentation of a research article (10 points). Lab Work: (40 points). Communication (15 points). Lab citizenship (15 points).
Cahill, Larry
Lab Contact:
Larry Cahill
A HUMAN BRAIN/BEHAVIO
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Caiozzo, Vincent
Lab Contact:
Bryan Rourke
bcrourke@uci.edu
(949) 824-5571
A NEURO MUSCL RES
Department: SOM - Orthopaedic Surgery
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N/A

Research Description

Studying hibernating muscle physiology & disuse atrophy in several non-model species, including ground-squirrels, bears, bats and marmots. Examining lizard species as well. Utilization of several molecular biology techniques. Involves analyzing the protein and mRNA profiles of myosin in muscle, using RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. Cloning myosin genes in the above species. Summer work may involve some travel to collect samples from collaborating institutions ( Colorado and the Sierra Nevada , CA).

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore standing or higher
Calof, Anne
Lab Contact:
Anne Calof
alcalof@uci.edu
(949) 824-5745
A DEV NEURBIOLOGY
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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N/A

Research Description

199 students are needed to participate in ongoing research on neural stem cells and molecular signals that regulate development and regeneration of the nervous system. Successful 199 students from the laboratory frequently become authors on papers published in scientific journals, and may have the opportunity to present their research at national conferences

Requirements to Participate

Minimum Sophomore (for exceptional cases) or Junior standing, willingness to perform 1 st quarter Pass/no pass basis to learn lab techniques, attend weekly lab meetings and present research in lab meetings.

Grade Point Average

3.4 GPA (this is sometimes negotiable)

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hours per week
Campbell, Diane
Lab Contact:
Diane Campbell
drcampbe@uci.edu
(949) 824-2242
A PLANT POP BIOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Research in my lab concern the mechanisms of evolution in natural plant populations. Current projects focus on plant hybrid zones. We are comparing the fitness of plant hybrids to that of the parental species to test particular models for genetic differentiation and evolution of new species. Approaches include experimental field studies in the Colorado Rockies and the eastern Sierras. These involve measurement of insect and bird pollinator behavior, pollination success, photosynthetic and other physiological traits, and seed production in common gardens. At UCI we do greenhouse studies of floral and physiological traits, and DNA analyses to examine the genetic structure of natural hybrid zones.

Requirements to Participate

Students with strong interest in ecology, genetics, and/or evolution. Bio 93 and 94 required. Bio 97 and E106 are helpful.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

6-12 hours/ wk
Chakravarthy, Bharath
Lab Contact:
Bharath Chakravarthy
bchakrav@uci.edu
N/A
B EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Emergency Medicine
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UCI Medical Center, 200 Building, Suite 710

Research Description

Analysis of Pediatric Psychiatric Emergency Department Visits at two Emergency Departments. This is a retrospective case review of emergency department visits at UC Irvine and Long Beach Memorial hospital. We will characterize the demographics of this population and analysis demographic data, length of stay and disposition. We will also look at subject determinants to see if this affects length of stay and patient disposition.

Requirements to Participate

Health occupations portfolio enhancement (HOPE) students only

Grade Point Average

N/A

Time Commitment per Week

4 _ 8 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation in data collection and manuscript preparation.
Chan, Jeff
Lab Contact:
Jeff Chan
jchan@uci.edu
(949) 824-9605
A OXIDATIVE STRESS
Department: SOM - Pathology
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N/A

Research Description

Cell growth and function require the coordinate regulation of gene expression by transcription factos. My lab seeks to understand the role of CNC-bZIP transcription factors in cellular stress response. Diverse molecular and genetic approaches are being applied to delineate the physiological roles of CNC factors in cell function; their roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and the genesis of cancer and other diseases; and the mechanisms by which these factors function

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

Twelve to Fifteen Hours a Week
Chang, Eric
Lab Contact:
Eric Chang
changey1@uci.edu
(714) 456-6668
B CLIN PAIN MGNT
Department: SOM - Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
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Gottschalk Medical Plaza, Long Beach VA Medical Center, Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility.

Research Description

Dr. Eric Y Chang is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, with research interest in neuropathic pain and spasticity in the Spinal Cord Injury population. He provides clinical services at the UCI Multi-disciplinary Pain Clinic, which serves as a model system for an integrated musculoskeletal, pain management, and electromyography clinic in Orange County. Dr. Chang received a K12 mentored career development award through the National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) to study the development of behavioral hypersensitivities in a rodent model of low back pain and degenerative disc disease. Low back pain is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and impacts considerably on the economy through loss of work, cost of health care, and societal support for the affected individual and their family. A common cause of back pain is from degenerative disc disease which may present with radicular pain. Currently, low back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is not well characterized and imaging studies do not correlate with the extent of pathology. In addition, little is known about the mechanisms associated with the actual progression of degenerative disc disease and radicular pain. As a result, these patients have limited diagnosis and treatment options for their pain and disability. Dr. Chang's research interests are in investigating the pain mechanisms of low back pain and the radicular pain state. His line of research focuses on using rodent models to correlate advanced degenerative disc disease and the biochemical mediators of pain in the spine.

Requirements to Participate

Attendance of Lab Meetings

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

4 hours per unit and a 1-year commitment

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation, willingness to learn, responsibility, efforts and quality of work, self-initiative, and dedication to work.
Chen, Dongbao
Lab Contact:
Dongbao Chen
dongbaoc@uci.edu
(949) 824-2409
A PERINATAL VASCULAR
Department: SOM - Obstetrics & Gynecology
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Med Surge I, Build 810, Rm 140

Research Description

Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hormone and growth factor regulation of vasodilatation and angiogenesis at the maternal, fetal and placental interface with focuses on reactive nitrogen and oxygen species.

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore and up. OTHER: Basic lab safety trainings

Grade Point Average

3.5+

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

1. Attendance 2. Experimental lab notes 3. Lab meeting presentations (2-3 times per quarter)
Chen, Phang-Leng
Lab Contact:
Phang-Leng Chen.
plchen@uci.edu
(949) 824-4008
A DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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Med Sci 1, Room D268

Research Description

The central theme of my research is to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms governing genome integrity with specific emphasis on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the DNA damage response and repair. Currently we focus on dissecting DNA surveillance mechanisms. Diverse molecular and genetic approaches using mammalian cell culture and yeast are being applied to delineate the DNA checkpoint factors in cell function; their role in DNA damage responses and repair

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be graded based on their performance and given a numeric number of A through F.
Chen, Jefferson
Lab Contact:
Jeff Chen
jeffewc1@uci.edu
714-456-6966
B NEUROSURG RESEARCH
Department: NeuroSurgery
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UCI medical center, Orange

Research Description

There are several ongoing research initiatives in neurosurgery. Some of these are 1. Multimodal Brain Monitoring in patients with head injury or stroke, 2. Development and implementation of new technologies for the ICU, 3. Assessment of Clinical and radiographic parameters of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus, 4. A retrospective review of the incidence of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus amongst patients that suffer ground level falls, 5. Assessment of new learning paradigms for medical students and residents in the neurosciences, 6. The development and implementation of new learning tools for patients and their families. BioSci 199 students may be involved with one or two projects depending on the level of interest and depth of commitment. Skills and knowledge required: ability to search and analyze the literature, ability to do retrospective chart reviews in a HIPPA compliant manner, familiarity with excel, familiarity with statistics, a basic knowledge of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.

Grade Point Average

3.7

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20 points (working assigned hours, being on time). Research Work: 20 points (quality, accuracy, ability to synthesize information, ability to search the literature and analyze). Communication: 20 points (written/oral reports, poster presentations,). Citizenship: 20 points (maintenance of patient confidentiality, Adherence to HIPPA, interactions with ancillary staff). Initiative: 10 points (thinking "outside of the box", new ideas). Scholarly activities: 10 points (participation in poster preparations, manuscript writing).
Chessler, Steven
Lab Contact:
Robert Bucayu, MS2
rbucayu@uci.edu
805.268.1501
B DIABET CARE& ISLETS
Department: Medicine (Endo)
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UCI Family Hlth Cntr-Santa Ana OR Gillespie Bldg,

Research Description

Two projects, one clinical (Project 1) and one laboratory/molecular biology (Project 2) are available and described here. Project 1: (clinical) Diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is a growing chronic illness among the Latino population. In 2012, 12.8% of the Latino population in the US was diagnosed with diabetes (CDC report). As technology has advanced, consumers can access information and resources to make more informed decisions regarding their health and illness management. However, patients often present with low literacy and low numeracy, which makes many written online resources ineffective. This can present challenges for Spanish speaking patients who are trying to understand a chronic illness and apply these concepts to their self-management. The purpose of this study is to look into the effective use of the popular Internet site YouTube as an information source on diabetes mellitus for Spanish-speaking patients. BioSci 199 students will be conducting a survey for patients at the UC Irvine Family Health Center - Santa Ana in order to help complete a needs assessment of current/existing Spanish health literacy/media. Patients eligible to complete the survey are: those who identify as Latino and speak Spanish for their primary language,and who have been diagnosed with diabetes for 1 year or more. Patients who are pregnant and/or have participated in 3 or more diabetes classes in the past year are ineligible. _________________ Project 2: (bench research, Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility; note that email contact is donaldel@uci.edu) The laboratory is interested in the cell and molecular biology of the pancreatic islet and, particularly, the islet beta cells. We focus on proteins expressed on the surface of islet cells and how they influence islet cell function, insulin secretion and the development of type 2 diabetes. We are also interested in testing candidate protein reagents for effects on insulin secretion. Our primary model systems are cultured beta cell lines. We sometimes also utilize mouse models and primary rat islets. A variety of standard molecular and cellular biology techniques are employed. Note that the contact email is different than Project 1; contact for this project is donaldel@uci.edu.

Requirements to Participate

Project 1: Ability to read and speak Spanish fluently (3rd year university level equivalent or native speaker), willingness to interact with native Spanish speakers and clarify their questions, willingness to be trained in obtaining informed consent from patients, maintaining confidentiality and security of all documents, and administering the survey in a consistent manner. Project 2: Coursework in biology, chemistry and biochemistry; lab experience preferred; at least 8 hrs/week; 3.3 GPA

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Project 1: Participation, responsibility, following proper survey protocol, efforts and quality of work, self-initiative, and dedication to work. Project 2: Effort and quality of work, self-initiative and dedication to work, proper lab safety protocols, acquisition of fundamental concepts. (Contact email for Project 2 is: donaldel@uci.edu)
Chessler, Steven
Lab Contact:
Donald Lee
donaldel@uci.edu
949-824-7814
A ISLET BIO, DIABETES
Department: Medicine
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Gillespie Facility

Research Description

The laboratory is interested in the cell and molecular biology of the pancreatic islet and, particularly, the insulin-producing islet beta cells. We focus on proteins expressed on the surface of islet cells and ask how they influence islet cell function, insulin secretion and the development of type 2 diabetes. We are also interested in testing candidate protein reagents for effects on insulin secretion and as possible therapies. Our primary model systems are cultured beta cell lines. We sometimes also utilize mouse models and primary rat islets. A variety of standard molecular and cellular biology techniques are employed. (I also sponsor a separate project that is strictly clinical, see separate 199 listing).

Requirements to Participate

1 year Commitment.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort and quality of work, self-initiative and dedication to work, proper lab safety protocols, acquisition of fundamental concepts.
Cho, Ken
Lab Contact:
Ken Cho
kwcho@uci.edu
(949) 824-7950
A MOLEC BIO OF DEV
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A

Research Description

In our laboratory we are interested in understanding growth factor signaling in early vertebrate embryogenesis. Using functional genomics along with molecular biology, we are investigating the morphological regulation of tumor growth factor-_ (TGF_) signaling in Xenopus and Mouse. Particularly, work for this project will contribute to elucidation of BMP signaling in pre and post implantation stages of mouse embryos.

Requirements to Participate

Applicant should have completed the first two years of Bio Sci Core courses. Preference will be given to junior students. COURSE COMPLETION: It is helpful if the applicant has completed D103 or D104, but not required.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

15

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality and quantity of work.
Choi, Bernard
Lab Contact:
Bernard Choi
choib@uci.edu
(949) 824-9491
A SURGERY
Department: SOM - Biomedical Engineering
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Beckman Laser Institute

Research Description

The mission of the Choi Microvascular Therapeutics & Imaging (MTI) Lab is to develop instrumentation and employ methods to improve in vivo characterization of the microvasculature. 199 students in my laboratory work in a multidisciplinary environment at the intersection of engineering, vascular biology, and clinical medicine. I strongly encourage independent research projects which encompass at least one (oftentimes several) of the following topics: 1. Optical imaging instrument development/characterization 2. Animal surgery 3. Clinical research 4. Light-based therapy monitoring 5. Computational modeling The most updated list of research opportunities can be viewed at the MTI lab website: http://choi.bli.uci.edu/

Requirements to Participate

Requirements vary by project. I am most interested in students who have at least two years to commit to research in my lab. COURSE COMPLETION: Course requirements vary by project.

Grade Point Average

3.5+

Time Commitment per Week

8+ hrs/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

I evaluate productivity and effort, and ability to integrate into the existing MTI lab framework.
CHOU, CHINSUI JODY N/A N/A
Chung, Judith
Lab Contact:
Jenillee San Juan
jenilles@uci.edu
714 456-5967
B MFM Research
Department: Obstetrics and Gynecology
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UCI Health

Research Description

We are evaluating and looking for tests to identify the risk of developing pregnancy problems in women who are pregnant for the first time. For this follow-up study, the same women will be evaluated over a few years following the pregnancy to see if there are early signs of cardiovascular disease in those who had problem pregnancies.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Lab Work: 70Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety). Lab citizenship: 15Pts (organization, clean up and follow through). Attendance: 15Pts (working assigned hours, being on time)
Cinquin, Oliver
Lab Contact:
Oliver Cinquin
ocinquin@uci.edu
(949) 824-9822
A STEM CELL DIFFERNTN
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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4103 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Multicellular organisms have evolved a great variety of cell types that perform specialized functions. Stem cell progeny that are destined to differentiate proliferate transiently and choose one of those cell types. This differentiation process, of great spatial and temporal precision, is at the heart of development and organ homeostasis. How differentiation is controlled is thus a question of tremendous importance from scientific and therapeutic standpoints. Although much progress has been made over the last century, a major stumbling block has appeared in the form of the complexity of the regulatory networks controlling differentiation. One of our approaches is to start from a fecund, simple model organ whose regulation has been extensively characterized at the genetic and biochemical levels: the C. elegans germ line. We ask how the current knowledge of regulatory parts all fits together to explain organ-level behavior. We perform experiments that target organ-level behavior of the germ line, rather than individual genes in the regulatory network. Guided by these experiments, and building on knowledge generated by many labs over the past 30 years, we use mathematical and computational methods to analyze how the regulatory network accounts for organ-level control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

Time Commitment per Week

16

Faculty Means of Evaluation

50% two page report summarizing the experiment, data gathered and conclusions. 50% quality of the experiments.
Civelli, Olivier
Lab Contact:
Olivier Civelli
ocivelli@uci.edu
(949) 824-2522
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pharmacology
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369 Med Surge II, School of Medicine

Research Description

Areas of research: molecular pharmacology, neurobiology, drug discovery. Central theme: discover novel neurotransmitters involved in brain disorders and discover drugs found in traditional Chinese medicines. Disorders currently studied: schizophrenia, obesity, drug addiction, pain, sleep disorders, stress. Students will have opportunity to participate in experiments covering all aspects of pharmacological research: molecular (cloning) and cellular (cell culture) biology, pharmacology (binding and second messenger assays) and animal behavior (if desired).

Requirements to Participate

Students interested in pharmacological/pharmaceutical research; commitment: 2 years or more. Preference to those with experience in biological and/or chemical techniques.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation, willingness to learn, responsibility
Cocco, Melanie
Lab Contact:
Melanie Cocco
A BIOMOLECULAR NMR
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Cohen-cory, Susana
Lab Contact:
Susana Cohen-cory
scohenco@uci.edu
(949) 824-8188
A DEVELOP NEUROBIO
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

Laboratory based research investigating mechanisms of neuronal development, with particular emphasis in the use of embryological and microscopy imaging techniques

Requirements to Participate

Bio. Majors and completion of freshman year that includes 1 yr. of general chem with labs, Bio Sci 93, and Bio Sci 94.
Cooper, Dan
Lab Contact:
Alfonso Ortiz
ortizac@uci.edu
(949) 824-5542
B PEDIATRICS
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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101 Academy Way, Suite 150, Irvine

Research Description

Premature birth is recognized as the single most important health problem in maternal child health in the US. Paradoxically, both failure to thrive and obesity are now known to be associated with prematurity, as are osteopenia (a condition where bone mineral density is lower than normal) and increased risk of fracture, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. We lack cohesive approaches to mitigate these profound threats to health. Despite promising new research demonstrating that physical activity can stimulate the growth of muscle and bone even during intrauterine life (perhaps through metabolic programming), there have been very few attempts to implement and study physical activity interventions in the premature baby. We are currently recruiting for a NIH funded study which exams the effects of a novel intervention program designed to increase physical activity of premature babies in their first year of life. The intervention has been designed and pilot tested_one that engages the caregiver as a partner. Using techniques and tools as far-ranging as DXA, smart phones, doubly labeled water, and lightweight, wireless accelerometers developed specifically for this purpose, the working hypothesis is that the one-year intervention will augment lean body mass (primary outcome variable) and improve bone mineralization and the ratio of lean to fat tissue (secondary outcome variables The potential beneficial impact of augmented physical activity on 1) Body composition 2) Associated biochemical and cellular mechanisms of growth and inflammation 3) Quality of maternal care will be measured.

Requirements to Participate

Attend Monday laboratory meetings from 10-11:30 AM.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

8-15 hours/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Reliability, ability to communicate and quality of work. We would like our students to apply for UROP grants and present at the symposium.
Cotman, Carl
Lab Contact:
Carl Cotman
cwcotman@uci.edu
(949) 824-5847
A NEUROCHEMISTRY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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1113 Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility

Research Description

Our current research focuses on biochemical and physiological mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory that generates a long-lasting strengthening of synaptic transmission. Specifically, our work aims to dissect molecular pathways involved in synaptic dysfunction in aging and Alzheimer’s disease with the ultimate goal of finding therapeutic strategies to prevent brain impairment. The student must be interested in laboratory research, which will include techniques such as Western blotting, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry on isolated synaptic terminals from brain tissue. The student will learn a novel method that we develop to study synaptic plasticity at the single-synapse level. Using this novel method the student will test multiple compounds to see if they can boost synaptic plasticity. Parallel studies involving human brain tissue (Alzheimer's disease and normal aged controls) will also be included as the student acquires the necessary skills.
Cramer, Karina
Lab Contact:
Karina Cramer
cramerk@uci.edu
(949) 824-4211
A NEURAL DEVELOPMENT
Department: Neurobiology and Behavior
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2113 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Our laboratory studies the development and plasticity of brain circuitry. We focus on auditory system pathways that are needed for sound localization. Our research has shown that these brain areas are affected in models of neurodevelopmental disorders. We study the roles of axon guidance molecules and other factors in setting up precise connections in the brain. We are also studying the roles of glial cells in the formation and maturation of circuits. Developmental mechanisms are often reinstated after injury. Our research also addresses the extent to which these mechanisms facilitate recovery after damage in the central nervous system.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Grade Point Average

3.0
Cramer, Steven
Lab Contact:
Robert Zhou
rzhou@uci.edu
949-824-8748
B BRAIN PLASTICITY
Department: Neurology
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1331 Hewitt Hall

Research Description

Project 1: Telerehabilitation. Participation will prepare students for improved understanding of stroke recovery and therapeutic techniques performed to aid in patient stroke recovery. Students will be involved in research comparing traditional clinical therapy for stroke recovery versus a telerehabilitation system, designed by our team. Students will have chances to see Occupational and Physical therapy techniques and testing measures. Main duties will include the following: working with therapists to help design recovery schedule for patients, subject assessments, statistical analyses of behavioral and testing data, and working with patients to teach the use of telerehabilitation system. Project 2: EEG Study. Participation will prepare students for an improved understanding of the human brain, how it functions and how it is affected by a new stroke. Students will participate in a research study to test different types of EEG caps and learn about how motor recovery works after stroke. Assessments will include EEG and behavioral testing. Main duties will include the following: setting up patients for EEG testing, analyses of EEG data, and subject assessments.

Requirements to Participate

commitment to participate for at least 2 years

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Time Commitment per Week

minimum of 6 hours a week (flexible); Number of unit required: 2

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Course grade based on caliber of performance and participation in lab journal club
Cribbs, David
Lab Contact:
David Cribbs
cribbs@uci.edu
(949) 824-3482
A AD-IMMUNOTHERAPY
Department: SOM - Neurology
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N/A

Research Description

My research interests are in the degenerative mechanisms that contribute to the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat the disease. My laboratory is currently focused on immunotherapy (A_-vaccine) as an experimental approach to test the Beta-Amyloid (A_) Cascade Hypothesis of AD and as a potential intervention for treating patients suffering from the disease. I utilize transgenic (Tg) mouse models that overexpress human mutant forms of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP/Tg). These mice develop extensive AD-like A_plaque pathology in the brain as they age. Thus, they provide a valuable experimental platform for testing hypotheses on disease mechanisms, as well as potential therapeutic and prophylactic approaches. When the APP/Tg mice are immunized with A_ peptide, the B cell epitope of A_ induces antibodies that bind to A_, which fafilitates clearance of the peptide from the brain. However, because A_is a self-antigen it is necessary to break the immune tolerance to self, thus the current immunization protocols rely on very powerful adjuvant systems. Unfortunately, the first clinical trial on AD patients (AN1792) was halted when approximately 6% of the participants developed an adverse inflammatory response in their brains (meningoencephalitis). Speculation on putative culprits for the failure of the clinical trial include the adjuvant (QS21) used to boost the immune response in the elderly patients, and the A_ ?self? T cell epitope. QS21 induced a strongly proinflammatory T cell-mediated (Th1) immune response specific to the A_ self T cell epitope. Additional factors that may have contributed to the adverse events in the elderly patients that received the vaccine include the level of vascular pathology, changes in blood brain barrier permeability induced by immunization, and the effects of aging on the immune response to A_-immunotherapy. My laboratory is developing mouse models that replicate the adverse events that occurred with the AN1792 clinical trial. These mouse models will be used to test the safety of ?second generation? vaccines that incorporate alternative strategies for inducing the therapeutic anti- A_ antibodies without inducing strong Th1 responses. The new vaccine candidates contain ?molecular adjuvants? that can amplify the humoral (antibody) response while attenuating the potentially dangerous cell-mediated immune response against A_. These include both peptide based and DNA based immunization strategies that include components of the complement system, innate immune system and cytokines in order to enhance antigen presentation and to polarize the immune response toward a Th2 phenotype. New pre-clinical trials in APP/Tg mice are critical for gaining a better understanding of the potential benefits, as well as, the risks associated with A_-immunotherapy as a strategy for treating AD patients. Students must be interested in laboratory research and motivated to complete an independent project. Research involves animal handling, behavioral testing, blood and solid tissue collection, fixation and staining of brain tissue and characterization of neuropathology. Students will also participate in vaccinating mice, analyzing serum by ELISA for antibodies against the beta-amyloid peptide. Interested students should submit an updated resume along with a list of completed chemistry, biology and neuroscience courses. Project assignments will be determined by the commitment and enthusiasm of the student for lab work. Interested students are encouraged to visit the lab prior to requesting a position.

Requirements to Participate

Must commit to work 8-12 hours per week, attend weekly lab meetings and present their research results during lab meetings. In addition, previous lab experience and competence with Photoshop, PowerPoint, Excel and statistical analysis are desirable.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hours per week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

The quality of laboratory work, lab meeting presentations and a quarterly paper on research results will figure eqaully in the grade evaluation for the 199 students.
Cui, Yijun N/A N/A
Cummings, Brian
Lab Contact:
Brian Cummings
cummings@uci.edu
(949) 824-3254
A TBI AND STEM CELLS
Department: SOM - Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
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845 Health Science Road, 2030 Sue & Bill Gross Hall

Research Description

Dr. Cummings in an Associate Professor in the Departments of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders and Anatomy & Neurobiology. His laboratory investigates the characterization of ES, iPS, and adult neural stem cell lines for use as therapeutics by studying the interactions between human neural stem cells and the injured CNS using in vitro and in vivo models of spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegeneration. One focus is the effect of the injured microenvironment on stem cell survival, differentiation, and engraftment. These experiments entail microsurgery, behavioral analysis, immunocytochemistry, stereological quantification of survival and fate, and electron microscopy. His laboratory has demonstrated that human neural stem cells differentiate into neurons, which form synaptic connections with an injured mouse host and oligodendrocytes, which remyelinate mouse axons. Subsequent behavioral improvements are abolished following selective ablation of engrafted human cells, demonstrating that human neural stem cells functionally integrate with their host and form meaningful connections (Cummings et al., PNAS, 2005, Hooshmand et al, PLoS One 2009). Cell-based therapeutic approaches are dependent upon immunosuppression in an otherwise normal animal or testing for proof of principal in immunodeficient models. This has significant implications for animal experiments and for human trials, where continuous immunosuppression may be required to obtain successful graft survival. Little is known about the direct effects of immunosuppressant drugs on neural stem cell proliferation or differentiation. His lab is currently examining the effects of immunosuppressants on human stem cell survival, proliferation and fate, as well as the interaction between cells of the immune system and stem cells. The lab is currently working with human embryonic stem cells (H9, HUES9 and Shef-3, Shef-4 and Shef-6), human amnion derived stem cells (from Stemnion LLC), and fetal derived neural stem cells (StemCells Inc). A new area of study focuses on the epigenetic changes that occur as cells are cultured or transitioned to xenofree (animal free) media conditions or exposed to biomaterials.

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Bio194 Safety and Ethics Research Course. On the last day of instruction of both the fall and winter quarter, students are required to turn in a 1-2 page summary of work completed. This can include background information obtained by reading the literature, details about a technique learned, and/or data generated. At the end of spring quarter, this paper will be replaced with a 15-minute scientific talk presented to the lab. All 199s are required to attend these talks.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, following appropriate lab and university-mandated safety protocols, initiative and overall enthusiasm for research.
Dai, Xing
Lab Contact:
Xing Dai
xdai@uci.edu
(949) 824-3101
A EPITHELIAL DEV
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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Med Sci I D288

Research Description

My laboratory studies the chromatin/transcriptional control of mammalian epithelial development and homeostasis, and how the epigenetic control mechanisms go awry during tumorigenesis. We focus on two closely related model tissues, namely mammary gland and skin (including hair follicle), and two classes of regulatory proteins, namely Pygo chromatin effectors and Ovol DNA-binding transcription factors. We employ a multidisciplinary approach combining mouse genetics with molecular/mechanistic studies to link the biological functions of these proteins in mammary and skin stem/progenitor cells to their biochemical activities in target gene expression and histone modification.

Requirements to Participate

REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: interested in research, motivated to learn COURSE COMPLETION: Bio lab

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10-15 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grade will be assigned based on hours spent, effort level, and work progress.
DAYAL, RAKHI N/A N/A
Delfino, Ralph
Lab Contact:
Ralph Delfino
rdelfino@uci.edu
(949) 824-1767
B MED PULM&CV EPI RSH
Department: SOM - Epidemiology
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Irvine Hall, and Community retirement centers

Research Description

Dr. Delfino's research evaluates multiple clinical, biological and genetic factors in order to understand the effects of air pollutants on respiratory health, cardiovascular function, oxidative stress, and airway and systemic inflammation. This is being accomplished with cohort panel studies in human subjects involving repeated measures of exposures and outcomes to obtain precise estimates of exposure-response relationships. Each subject serves as his or her own control. The goal is to understand the chemical composition, size factions and properties of particles that lead to observed health effects, and to trace these characteristics back to their sources. This opportunity would be appropriate for students interested in biostatistical methods as they are used in medical research, clinical and medical aspects of the environmental sciences as they relate to human health and chronic diseases

Requirements to Participate

The motivation and interest in medical research and the intention to pursue a post-baccalaureate degree. Upper division enrollment status with completion of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry. Completion of calculus or statistics courses equivalent to at least MATH 2A, MATH 2B and STATS 7. Experience with SAS software is desirable, but not required.

Grade Point Average

Minimum GPA of 3.00

Time Commitment per Week

8 to 12 hours per week with a minimum commitment of 3 consecutive academic quarters.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

N/A
Demetriou, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Demetriou
mdemetri@uci.edu
949-824-9774
A IMMUN & T CELLS
Department: SOM - Neurology
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208 Sprague Hall

Research Description

The Demetriou lab is interested in understanding how genetic and metabolic regulation of protein glycosylation controls function and activity of cell surface glycoproteins. Virtually all cell surface and secreted proteins in animals are modified by the addition of complex carbohydrates in the ER/Golgi secretory pathway, imparting substantial molecular information not encoded by the genome. We find that genetic, metabolic and environmental regulation of Golgi N-glycosylation controls macromolecular complexes on the cell surface to influence cell growth, differentiation and disease states such as autoimmunity. We are currently further defining the role of N-glycosylation in B cell development, immunosenescence, and exploring supplementation of the N-glycan biosynthesis as a therapeutic strategy to suppress an underlying molecular defect promoting human autoimmunity.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 4 units.
Djalilian, Hamid
Lab Contact:
Hamid Djalilian
hdjalili@uci.edu
(714) 456-5853
B AUDITORY
Department: SOM - Otolaryngology
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UCI Medical Center Bldg 56, Suite 500

Research Description

The purpose of this project is to use a novel method to stimulate the facial, hearing and balance nerves using a penetrating electrode. Restoring hearing, balance, or facial function will be attempted by stimulating the respective nerves in an animal model.

Requirements to Participate

Life sciences or engineering major or concentration

Grade Point Average

3 or higher

Time Commitment per Week

8 hrs

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Completion of assigned tasks, feedback on experiments, reading
Do, An
Lab Contact:
An Do
and@uci.edu
714-456-2332
B Brain-Comp Intrface
Department: Neurology
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Engineering Gateway 3121

Research Description

The emphasis of the lab is to develop brain-computer interfaces to help restore motor function in people with paralysis due to stroke or spinal cord injury. Students will be involved in research activities related to the development and testing of such brain-computer interface systems. Research tasks include neural signal data collection and analysis, programming, circuit design, electrophysiological experiments, and/or brain-computer interface experiments.

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore or higher standing. Preferable to have prior background in neuroscience, computer science, signal analysis, and/or circuits design.

Grade Point Average

3.4 or above

Time Commitment per Week

3 hours per unit, minimum of 2 units

What does it take to complete this course?

Completing the course will require fulfillment of the time commitment for research - including the use of this time to complete research assignments, participate in lab meetings, submit UROP applications, and write research abstracts and manuscripts.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on their ability to complete research tasks, perform literature research, collect data, and present methods and results.
Donovan, Peter
Lab Contact:
Peter Donovan
A STEM/GERM CELL BIO
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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N/A
Edinger, Aimee
Lab Contact:
Aimee Edinger
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Edwards, Robert
Lab Contact:
Robert Edwards
redwards@uci.edu
(949) 824-8576
A MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pathology
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N/A

Research Description

We study a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. The mouse is knocked out of the pertussis-toxin sensitive G-protein alpha subunits, Gia2. These animals spontaneously develop inflammation in the colon after 6 weeks of age which mimics Crohn's disease; these mice subsequently develop colon cancer. Our work has identified a number of signaling abnormalities whose potential contribution to the development of disease is being studied. We are interested in how the lack of Gia2 affects the development of the immune system, the intestinal epithelium, and how different cell types (epithelial, stromal, and lymphoid) that lack Gia2 interact in regulating mucosal immune responses and the development of cancer in these mice. The work involves mouse husbandry, animal and tissue culture experiments, nucleic acid protein work, and an array of analyte determinations.

Requirements to Participate

Completed standard prerequisites for Bio 199, at least a sophomore or greater. Prefer students with expressed interest in aspirations for advanced degrees in biological sciences.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

8-10 hrs/wk
Ehlert, Frederick J.
Lab Contact:
Frederick J. Ehlert
fjehlert@uci.edu
949-824-6208
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: Pharmacology
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Rm 305 Med Surge II

Research Description

My lab studies how drugs interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors number about 1000 and they mediate the effects of numerous natural signaling molecules in the body as well as xenobiotics. In addition they are the target for many drugs used in medicine including orthosteric agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators. The latter turn on, turn off, and modulate receptor function, respectively. Candidate drugs are often evaluated in vitro using a variety of signaling assays in cells and tissues. The initial drug-receptor interaction is transduced through natural or artificial biochemical signaling pathways that ultimately culminate in a measurable output response. The ability of a drug to elicit an output response through different signaling pathways often varies depending the nature of the cells or tissues in which the receptor is expressed, even if the same signaling pathway is involved in eliciting the response. My lab has developed a method for analyzing the downstream output response of a receptor to determine how drugs interact with single receptors. In the absence of drugs and natural messengers in the body, single receptors usually spend most of their time in the off state. When bound with an agonist, receptors randomly switch on and off. Knowing how tightly a drug binds to the on (active) state, relative to the off (inactive) state, enables scientists to predict how well an agonist activates a receptor. In addition, a given receptor may have different active states that turn on different signaling pathways. Having a means of measuring how tightly a drug binds to different active states of a receptor enables scientists to determine the spectrum of therapeutic and toxic effects of a drug. An ideal drug is one that selects for active states that mediate therapeutic signaling pathways only and not pathways that cause side effects. Currently, most of the ongoing work in my lab involves validating our methods of analysis using computational methods. In addition, user-friendly applications are being developed to enable the scientific community to apply our methods of analysis.

Requirements to Participate

Prior coursework in cell biology.

Grade Point Average

Above 3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Professionalism and work output and quality.
Emerson, J.J
Lab Contact:
J.J Emerson
jje@uci.edu
(949) 824-9527
A EVOLUTION & GENOMES
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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McGaugh Hall 5230

Research Description

Research in the Emerson lab involves evolutionary genetics and genomics. Methods and techniques involved in research in the Emerson lab include genome sequencing of DNA and RNA, statistical inference on large biological datasets, bioinformatics, and computer simulation. Current projects available for undergraduate research include comparative genomics and comparative population genetics in Drosophila species and working on theory of the evolution of phenotype.

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 97.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk
Evans, Gregory
Lab Contact:
Gregory Evans
gevans@uci.edu
(714) 456-5755
B SURGERY
Department: SOM - Plastic Surgery
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200 S. Manchester Ave., Suite 650, Orange, CA 92868

Research Description

The focus of our lab is tissue engineering. Herein, we work in several different fields: 1. Genetically transfected human embryonic kidney stem cells to produce NGF secretion and to improve peripheral nerve regeneration; 2. Improvement of peripheral nerve regeneration by human adipose derived stem cells differentiated into neural lineage cells; 3. Direct differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells into beta-islet cells; 4. Microcirculation in free flaps, impact of tissue harvest and ischemia reperfusion injury; 5. Improvement of wound healing by enhanced cryoprecipitate; 6. Early detection of vascular thrombosis and disturbances by modulated imaging. Students who are interested will learn about basic techniques in cell cultures, molecular techniques as RT-PCR, ELISA, immunohistology, immunocytology, Western Blot, histomorphometry, and will be involved in animal models including functional evaluations of nerve injuries, etc..

Requirements to Participate

3 quarter minimum commitment, willing to work with rats, some knowledge in medical statistics, experiences in molecular techniques preferred.

Grade Point Average

3.5 or greater

Time Commitment per Week

At least 10 hours per week, Blocks of 2-3 hours minimum

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, quality of work, dedication, empathy.
Faiola, Celia
Lab Contact:
Celia Faiola
cfaiola@uci.edu
949 824 2061
A ECOLOGY & CLIMATE
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
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Steinhaus 428 & 429, local field sites

Research Description

Ecological climatology is the interdisciplinary study of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and climate. One interaction with important implications for climate change is the biological production, release and ultimate fate of plant volatiles. Our research investigates how global change is altering plant volatile emission rates and what this change means for plant-atmosphere interactions. Student projects could focus on measurements of plant volatiles and/or measurements of cloud precursors formed from plant volatiles. Projects could involve collecting measurements from plants in local field environments around Orange County, simulated climate change scenarios in the laboratory, or integrate previous measurements into modeling experiments.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 2 units.

Grade Point Average

2.8

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students are evaluated on work ethic, initiative, and attainment of research goals defined at the beginning of each term.
Fan, Hung
Lab Contact:
Hung Fan
A TUMOR VIROLOGY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Fiandaca, Massimo
Lab Contact:
Massimo S. Fiandaca, MD, MBA
mfiandac@uci.edu
(949) 824-5579
A TRANSLATIONAL NEURO
Department: Neurology
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Sprague Hall, 3rd Floor

Research Description

The faculty and staff affiliated with the Translational Laboratory and Biorepository (TLaB) at UCI welcome enterprising students with research interest in the biological/medical sciences, especially related to neuroscience. Opportunities exist in the TLaB for students to be engaged in projects related to human cognition in health and disease, and blood-based biomarkers for predicting or assessing neurological disorders. In addition, students would have the opportunity to learn about how animal models of Parkinson's disease can assist in the development of novel approaches to treatment, including drug development and gene therapy. For additional information please refer to the syllabus.

Grade Point Average

>3.3

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 2 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Interim Reports: At the end of each quarter the student will provide the faculty mentor with a written summary of work accomplished, methods learned, and other experiences during the preceding quarter and how it applies to the individual's educational goals as well as the mission and goals of the TLaB. - 55 points. Communication: (quality of written/oral reports, discussions with faculty mentor(s) and staff). - 45 points. Attendance: Will be determined by laboratory faculty and staff (being on time, attending lab meetings, coordinating work schedule with TLaB members). - 40 points. Lab Citizenship: (organization, clean up, follow through). - 30 points. Fun: Does your presence and participation in the TLaB provide your co-workers with a positive daily experience and attitude toward the student? - 30 points. Total 200 points.
Fisher, Mark
Lab Contact:
Mark Fisher
mfisher@uci.edu
(714) 456-6856
B STROKE RESEARCH
Department: SOM - Neurology
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Shanbrom Hall, Room 121, UC Irvine Medical Center

Research Description

Laboratory of Stroke and Vascular Neurobiology: The laboratory focuses on fundamental mechanisms of stroke, a leading cause of death in North America. Stroke is usually caused by blood clots blocking arteries of the brain, or by excessive bleeding in the brain. The laboratory investigates how blood clot formation and bleeding are regulated by the brain, a process referred to as ?brain specific hemostasis regulation?. We use cell culture models of the brain microvasculature (?blood-brain barrier?) and animal models of experimental stroke and brain hemorrhage.

Requirements to Participate

At least two quarter commitment

Grade Point Average

3.0 or higher

Time Commitment per Week

8 hours minimum

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Oral and written presentations.
Flanagan, Lisa
Lab Contact:
Lisa Flanagan
lflanaga@uci.edu
(949) 824-5786
A NEURAL STEM CELL
Department: Neurology
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Gross Hall

Research Description

Neural stem cells hold great promise as potential therapuetic agents for a variety of central nervous system diseases and injuries. Our lab is interested in intrinsic and extrinsic regulators of cortical neural stem cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and neurite outgrowth/regeneration. Projects will utilize cell culture, immunocytochemistry, microscopy, collaborations with colleagues in biomedical engineering, behavioral analysis, and data analysis. Resumes with a completed course list can be sent by email. Dr. Flanagan's website: http://faculty.sites.uci.edu/flanaganlab/labmembers/prospective/

Requirements to Participate

Recommended 3.5 GPA, expect 12+ hours per week with 4 hours per unit, prefer 2 year or more commitment. Interest in cell biology and neuroscience or bioengineering, highly motivated, good organizational skills. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 194S, preferred completion of laboratory coursework.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Completion of assigned tasks, understanding of biology, communication skills, enthusiasm and commitment.
Fleischman, Angela
Lab Contact:
Angela Fleischman
agf@uci.edu
(949) 824-2559
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology
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Sprague Hall

Research Description

Our laboratory focuses on myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), a chronic leukemia. We are investigating the role of inflammation as a driver of disease initiation as well as the clinical manifestations of the disease. We utilize primary patient samples and mouse models of the disease. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio lab; NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED: in keeping with the hours spent.

Requirements to Participate

interested in research, motivated to learn

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10-15 hours per week minimal

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grade will be assigned based on hours spent, effort level, and work progress.
Forthal, Donald
Lab Contact:
Donald Forthal or Hiroki Saito
dnfortha@uci.edu or hirokis@uci.edu
949-824-3365 or 714-456-5135
A MEDICINE
Department: Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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Hewitt Hall 3rd floor or Computer-based research

Research Description

Project #1 - Contact Professor Forthal at dnfortha@uci.edu or 949-824-3365. Location of research is Hewitt Hall 3rd floor. Research description: HIV immunology. We work with antibodies to try to understand how they interact with cells involved in host defense. The research is ultimately aimed at developing a vaccine to prevent HIV infection. 3-4 hours/week. 3 quarters minimum; because of in-lab training requirements, we prefer those who can remain in the lab for more than one year. Grade is based on effort and attendance. Project #2 - Contact Hiroki Saito at hirokis@uci.edu or (714) 456-5135. Computer-based research location. Research description: We are investigating the world’s medical literature in order to determine if there are biases in how clinical studies are published. In particular, we have found evidence that medical issues of specific importance to the developing world generate fewer publications than those of importance to developed countries; this bias may be related to drug company funding. 2-4 hours/week. No minimum quarter commitment. Require some computer skills. Grade is based on effort.
Fortier, Michelle
Lab Contact:
UCI Center on Stress and Health
ucicsh@uci.edu
N/A
B PEDIATRIC HEALTH
Department: SOM - Anesthes & Perioperative Care
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UCI Center on Stress & Health 505 S. Main St. Suite 940 Orange, CA 92868

Research Description

The UCI Center on Stress & Health (UCI CSH) is a collaborative group from diverse areas in medicine and psychology aimed to assist children and families manage pain, anxiety and stress surrounding the medical environment and disease burden. UCI CSH is directed by Dr. Zeev Kain, Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care and Associate Dean of Clinical Research at UCI and Dr. Michelle Fortier, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care at UCI and Pediatric Psychologist at CHOC. The UCI CSH team is comprised of multi-disciplinary collaboration between anesthesiologists, psychologists, surgeons, pediatricians, nurses, child life specialists, biomedical engineers, and computer scientists. Several on-going applied behavioral research studies are being conducted in multiple medical settings including perioperative, hematology/oncology, and neonatology. Because of the large population of Spanish speaking families at CHOC, we are especially interested in bilingual students who may assist with the recruitment of these families to our research studies. BENEFITS: Working in an interdisciplinary field in the medical setting. Exposure to human subjects research and in-person recruitment. Involvement in conducting research studies including weekly lab meetings, data entry, patient recruitment and interaction.

Requirements to Participate

Students should have transportation to get to and from CHOC Children's located in Orange. Dress code required - business casual or scrubs. Reliability and professionalism are extremely important. - Interview required

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 10-13 hrs./week commitment; Minimum of 3 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

-Timely completion of hours -Presentation of relevant literature -Independent research projects
Fortin, Norbert
Lab Contact:
Norbert Fortin
A BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCI
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Fowler, Christie
Lab Contact:
Christie Fowler
cdfowler@uci.edu
949-824-8363
A NICOTINE ADDICTION
Department: Neurobiology and Behavior
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1321 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Studies will be conducted to examine the neurobiological mechanisms mediating nicotine dependence. Research will involve behavioral assays, behavioral assessments, immunohistochemistry and/or molecular experiments.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit; minimum 2 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time). Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety). Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through).
Fox, John
Lab Contact:
Read Description for two projects - two different contact information
jfox@uci.edu
B EMERGNCY ULTRASOUND
Department: SOM - Emergency Medicine
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Medical Education building at the main campus.

Research Description

Project 1: Contact Angela Allen at angelaa@uci.edu or (562) 221-2987. Emergency Ultrasound involves the use of portable ultrasound machines at the bedside of patients in the emergency department. The new field requires clinical research that supports its implementation by proving its safety and efficacy in a wide variety of applications. Currently we have over 20 protocols ranging from first trimester complications of pregnancy to medical student ultrasound. Minimum GPA: 3.5. Tuesday/Thursday availability. Must have the ability to work independently as well as in a group setting. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Project 2: Contact micurapteam@gmail.com or The Medical Intensive Care Unit Research Associates Program (MICU-RAP) is a clinical research program at the UCI Medical Center in Orange, CA founded by Dr. Elizabeth Turner in 2011, is currently run by Dr. Mark Rosen, M.D., and is overseen by Dr. John Christian Fox, M.D. MICU-RAP provides undergraduates with a unique opportunity to contribute directly to research projects in the Intensive Care Unit through first-hand experience with patient interaction and close faculty mentorship from the UCI School of Medicine. During each four-hour shift, students are in contact with patients, families, and physicians to obtain consent and collect data for studies. While participating in MICU-RAP, students can pursue leadership opportunities by serving as ?liaisons? for chosen projects and thereby play a key role in the implementation and integrity of research protocol for that study. Our current studies involve the utilization of ultrasound, an extremely fast growing field, for various procedures. We place a strong emphasis on being able to interact independently and confidently with physicians as well as to communicate effectively in a group setting. Minimum GPA: 3.3. 199 students are expected to attend the weekly research meetings held in Dr. Fox's office in the Medical Education building at the main campus held on Tuesday nights and have 8-5 availability.
French, Kathryn
Lab Contact:
Kathryn French
kasteinh@uci.edu
(714) 456-6883
B PEDIA-GEN
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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City Tower, UCI Medical Center, Orange.

Research Description

This project involves obtaining pregnancy outcome information from patients undergoing amniocentesis or CVS procedures at UCI Medical Center. The outcome information is gathered on each perinatologist to determine if patients undergoing these invasive tests have a higher than acceptable risk of pregnancy complications. Students also assist in data entry and are given the opportunity to participate in patient conferences as well as observe genetic counseling and prenatal testing procedures such as ultrasound, amniocentesis and CVS at UCI Medical Center

Requirements to Participate

Students interested in Genetic Counseling, obstetrics, genetics and/or obstetrics are encouraged to participate

Time Commitment per Week

4-8 hours per week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students are graded based on accurate and timely completion of duties performed in a professional manner.
Frostig, Ron
Lab Contact:
Ron Frostig
rfrostig@uci.edu
(949) 824-2883
A DYNAMIC BRAIN REORG
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Our main research interests include basic and preclinical research of the structure, function and plasticity of the cerebral cortex _ the most sophisticated part of the brain believed to support higher brain functions like perception and learning and memory. Plasticity refers to the unique ability of the cortex to modify its structure and function depending on factors such as changes in the animal's environment, injury, and learning and memory. Most of our research focuses on the sensory subregions of the cortex (somatosensory, auditory and visual) in adult rodents (rats and mice). We apply many techniques to investigate the cortex such as functional imaging, neuronal recordings, histology, pharmacology, gene manipulations, and behavior. Examples of some recent research projects include: identifying a new type of plasticity where mild sensory stimulation (tactile or auditory) can completely protect the cortex from stroke; demonstrating massive cortical plasticity (structure and function) following the transfer of rodents from their single, small cages to a large specialized environment (?naturalistic habitat?) that encourages rodents to interact, play, dig tunnels, and forage; and elucidating fundamental principles of how structure and function of sensory cortex interact to support perception. For more details see our website at: http://frostiglab.bio.uci.edu/

Requirements to Participate

We are looking for students with strong curiosity and high level of self-motivation. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio N110 recommended but not essential.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Dependability, level of understanding and performance, and overall participation.
Fruehauf, John
Lab Contact:
John Fruehauf
jfruehau@uci.edu
(714) 456-5153
B MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A

Research Description

Students will carry out in vitro cell line work to determine the effects of anticancer agents on tumor cell and tumor vascular cell growth. Antiangiogenesis models will be emphasized. Cancer pharmacology will be reviewed. For some studies, biomarker correlates with drug response will be determined using immunohistochemistry, image analysis, flow cytometry, gene expression arrays and proteomics techniques. Students will be expected to define a hypothesis driven project, present a15 minute lecture summarizing their objectives, prepare a mid term oral and written report, and present a final oral and written report. When data are of adequate quality, the student will be encouraged to submit a manuscript for publication and to present their work at the UCI science fair.

Requirements to Participate

Introductory Biology and Chemistry - Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry preferred.

Grade Point Average

3
Fruman, David
Lab Contact:
David Fruman
dfruman@uci.edu
(949) 824-1947
A IMMUNO & CELL BIO
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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3407 McGaugh Hall.

Research Description

Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a group of signaling enzymes that regulate most aspects of immune cell development and function. Increased PI3K signaling is associated with autoimmunity and cancer. Dr. Fruman's laboratory uses genetic and pharmacological approaches to define the unique and shared functions of PI3K isoforms in different lymphocyte subsets. The laboratory is also interested in the kinase mTOR, that is activated downstream of PI3K and other signals. Dr. Fruman's research group is testing novel inhibitors of PI3K and mTOR for potential therapeutic value in autoimmune diseases and leukemia.

Requirements to Participate

Attendance at lab meeting weekly, with an oral presentation once per quarter starting in the second quarter of enrollment. Submission of written summary of research progress at the end of each quarter. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 97, 98 GRADE POINT AVERAGE: Minimum 3.0 in Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences courses

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort, attendance and progress in research skills.
Gall, Christine
Lab Contact:
Christine Gall
cmgall@uci.edu
949-824-8652
A NEUROPEP/PLASTICITY
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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Gillespie Neurosi. Res. Facility

Research Description

Research is focussed on synaptic mechanisms of learning and memory. Studies in rats and mice are evaluating mechanisms, and brain systems, involved in different forms of learning. This includes experiments evaluating the roles of modulatory substances (endocannabinoids, neurosteroids such as estrogen, growth factors) in learning and its impairment in congenital disorders such as Downs Syndrome and autism. Experiments involve behavioral, microscopic, and electrophysiological techniques. We are also interested in persons with good computer skills for data analysis and modeling treatment effects on behavior.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 3 units. Persons need to work a somewhat flexible schedule to fit into the experimental plan.

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students are largely evaluated on effort, reliability (specifically keeping agreements as to when they will be in the lab and what functions they will be responsible for), and time commitment. Students are also expected to be good laboratory citizens and to contribute to maintenance of the facilities that they use.
Gandhi, Sunil
Lab Contact:
Sunil Gandhi
spgandhi@uci.edu
(949) 824-8761
A VISUAL PLASTICITY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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McGaugh Hall

Research Description

The laboratory is focused on 1) discovering the developmental mechanisms that guide the experience-dependent organization of the juvenile brain, and 2) exploiting these mechanisms to reactivate brain plasticity in the adult brain. We perform our studies primarily in the visual system of mice, using a diverse array of experimental methods including neuronal culture and transplantation, in vivo two-photon imaging, viral and transgenic gene manipulations, optogenetics, and visually guided behavior. Since these techniques require considerable training, a multi-quarter commitment is needed. Students will be encouraged to develop an independent research project after acquiring necessary skills.

Requirements to Participate

We seek students that are highly self-motivated and eager to engage in research. Attendance at weekly lab meetings and sub-group meetings required. COURSE COMPLETION: N110 recommended but not essential

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades depend on quality of work and time and effort committed.
Ganesan, Anand
Lab Contact:
Anand Ganesan
aganesan@uci.edu
(949) 824-0547
A MELANCYTE BIOLOGY
Department: SOM - Dermatology
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Sprague Hall.

Research Description

Our laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the production of melanin pigment in the melanocyte and the molecular mechanisms that control melanoma chemoresistance against multiple agents. Our work utilizes tissue culture models, mouse models, and also includes translational studies with human tissues

Requirements to Participate

REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: Junior or Senior COURSE COMPLETION: completed introductory biology course and preferably a biochemistry or molecular biology laboratory course. OTHER: The undergraduate will need to be committed to research work and need to be able to work independently. Undergraduates with interest in pursuing a PhD or MD/PhD degree are preferred over those that are interested in entering medical school.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12-15 hrs per week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

The student will be evaluated based on their presentations in group meeting and their interactions with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the lab.
Gardiner, David
Lab Contact:
David Gardiner
dmgardin@uci.edu
(949) 824-2792
A LIMB REGENERATION
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Role of signaling pathways in the induction of scar-free wound healing and limb regeneration. Successful completion of first year courses _ strong interest in regeneration

Requirements to Participate

*Note: Enroll in course code under Dr. Susan Bryant.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10
Gargus, Jay
Lab Contact:
Dave Ferguson
dferguso@uci.edu
(949) 824-9253
B STUDIES IN AUTISM
Department: SOM - Physiology & Biophysics
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2056 Hewitt Hall

Research Description

Students will work within the Center for Autism Research and Treatment (CART) performing biophysical studies of cell signaling that include imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry. Many of the cell lines used have single gene mutations that produce an autism phenotype, which these are being used to resolve the signaling pathways perturbed in typical Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Students will be trained in implementing study protocols, data collection techniques, data entry, data processing, and statistical analysis. Good opportunity for students interested in careers in medicine, clinical psychology, pharmacology and neuroscience.

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 194S

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Reliability and consistency in attendance. Completion of assignments and required hours. Discussions of research papers.
Geater, Charlene N/A N/A
Gee, Kelvin
Lab Contact:
Minhtam Tran
minhtamt@uci.edu
(949) 824-4532
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pharmacology
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Med Surg. II Room 385, 375 and 372

Research Description

The main focus of our laboratory is on the characterization of novel allosteric modulatory sites on receptors that are potential drug targets for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. The design, delivery and development of novel compounds which modulate these sites can then be used to validate these targets in animal models of disease. Currently, our laboratory is involved in two areas of drug discovery research. This first area involves allosteric modulatory sites on gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors which have therapeutic relevance for disorders such as anxiety, epilepsy and insomnia. The second area involves allosteric modulatory sites on specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which have therapeutic relevance for disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and autism. The development of novel compounds that selectively modulate these receptor systems represents a crucial step in the drug discovery process on the path to more effective treatments of these diseases. 199 students in our laboratory will learn and participate in the performance of various in vivo pharmacological methods to measure learning and memory performance in the rodent.

Requirements to Participate

End of sophomore year and beyond COURSE COMPLETION: Biological sciences and general chemistry

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Time Commitment per Week

9-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation in laboratory meetings and discussion of data from experiments in which the student helped conduct. Ability to learn the concepts used in the experimental studies and explain the rationale for these experiments.
Gehricke, Jean
Lab Contact:
Jean Gehricke
jgehrick@uci.edu
(949) 267-0484
B PSYCHIATRY
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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2500 Red Hill Ave., Ste. 100, Santa Ana.

Research Description

Research on Autism and ADHD. RESEARCH DESCRIPTION: Dr. Gehricke's research focuses on the causes and treatment of mental disorders including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and drug abuse. Study how the brain, genes and environment interact and contribute to human behavior. Learn how to conduct brain imaging studies and behavioral interventions research. Students will be trained in implementing study protocols, data collection techniques, data entry, data processing, and statistical analysis. Good opportunity for students interested in careers in medicine, clinical psychology, pharmacology and neuroscience.

Time Commitment per Week

8to 10hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

eliability and consistency in attendance. Completion of assignments and required hours. Discussions of research papers. Brief paper in one area of human behavioral research.
German, Donovan
Lab Contact:
Donovan German
dgerman@uci.edu
(949) 824-2772
A ECOLOGICAL PHYSIOL
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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5309 McGaugh Hall.

Research Description

Spanning from the molecular to the whole-organism level, research in my laboratory is focused on the energy acquisition strategies of organisms. In short, I am interested in understanding how organisms make a living and the consequences of different energy acquisition strategies for ecosystem fluxes. Hence, this truly is ecological physiology. Current projects include work with marine and freshwater fishes, as well as microbes from terrestrial and aquatic systems. Student projects may focus on field work, laboratory studies, and/or computer work with bioinformatics.

Requirements to Participate

Students should have a strong interest in ecological physiology and be prepared to develop independent projects. Students will be expected to participate in lab activities and weekly lab meetings. To apply for a position, please visit http://german.bio.uci.edu , download the Bio 199 Research Application form, and send the form back to dgerman@uci.edu. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 194. Students should at least be in second year of instruction, although exceptional first year students will be considered.

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be based on time committed to the project and the quality of research.
Gershon, Paul
Lab Contact:
Paul Gershon
pgershon@uci.edu
(949) 824-9606, 7954
A PROTEOMICS
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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1222 Natural Sciences 1

Research Description

I am active in four areas: (1) We operate a protein (proteomics mass spectrometry facility containing two powerful, state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometers along with nanoflow/nanocapillary two-dimensional peptide fractionation HPLC with robotics. Last year, several 199s deftly learned to operate these instruments and used them to, among other things, identify all the proteins in some of the world_ largest viruses. We will now be identifying and quantitating the proteins characteristic of diseased/tumorigenic cells and developmental abnormalities. (2) My lab is currently funded to investigate the structure and molecular dynamics of the enzyme poly(A) polymerase (PAP), using the vaccinia virus enzyme as a model. The vaccinia PAP was the first PAP for which a gene was identified (by the P.I.), and we recently learned its three-dimensional structure. Vaccinia PAP is the only known polymerase that can translocate independently on single-stranded nucleic acid. How does it do this on a non-rigid polymer? Come to my lab and solve the mystery. (3) A collaboration between my lab and that of Dr. Alex McPherson (MB&B) has led to the clearest images obtained thus far of vaccinia virus particles and subviral assemblies, providing a unique opportunity to identify viral proteins and functions present in various subviral assemblies. This dovetails well with protein mass spectrometry (above). (4) I am also funded to investigate the catalytic mechanism of RNA O-methylation. Vaccinia virus protein VP39 provided the first three-dimensional structure for any poxvirus protein and any RNA methyltransferase. The structure was then solved again, with bound RNA substrate and cofactor. Using various chemical, biochemical and NMR techniques, we are elucidating aspects of its catalytic mechanism from hypotheses arising from the three-dimensional structure. Overall, prior undergraduate interns in my lab have been included as authors on manuscripts submitted for publication, and some current ones will be.
Ghoniem, Gamal
Lab Contact:
Desiree Lee
Delee1@uci.edu
(714) 509-2170
B CLINICAL UROLOGY
Department: SOM-UROLOGY
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UCI Medical Center and City Tower 333 City Blvd W

Research Description

Students will work alongside a team to receive hands on clinical research experience. The experience will encompass current and future research projects giving them the opportunity to participate in different stages including, IRB submission, study startup, project design, background literature search, proposals, enrolling patients in studies, data compilation and writing/presenting research. Opportunities for publication are available. The clinical research will be conducted under Dr. Gamal Ghoniem in the Department of Urology. Dr. Ghoniem has published extensively in the field of Female Urology and Voiding Dysfunction. Dr. Ghoniem has improved and introduced many diagnostic and surgical techniques in the field of urinary incontinence and pelvic prolapse.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, quality and accuracy of work, safety and communication.
Glabe, Charles
Lab Contact:
Charles Glabe
cglabe@uci.edu
(949) 824-6081
A SURFACE CELL BIOCH
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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3438 McGaugh Hall.

Research Description

We work primarily on Alzheimer's disease, but we also work on other amyloid-related degenerative diseases, like Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and type II diabetes. We are focused on amyloid aggregation and self assembly and the structure of amyloid aggregates. We are especially interested in the mechanisms of amyloid in disease pathogenesis and the development of immunological approaches to therapeutic development.

Requirements to Participate

You need to be a student. You also need to convince me of your commitment to research and your intellectual ability to conduct research. The earlier you start, the better. We are looking for a mutually beneficial experience for the student and your direct laboratory supervisor. This is not like a job in the sense that we have positions open that we are looking to fill. You need to convince me to make space for you in a laboratory that is already crowded. COURSE COMPLETION: Yes OTHER: Participating in lab meetings when possible.

Grade Point Average

Typically an A. If you are not doing A quality work, it is not beneficial for either of us and you will need to consider doing something else.

Time Commitment per Week

9 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Showing up on time, putting in the required hours and making progress on your project. Your daily lab supervisor will be a graduate student or postdoctoral fellow who will also help evaluate your participation and progress.
Goldin, Alan
Lab Contact:
Alan Goldin
agoldin@uci.edu
(949) 824-5334
A MICROBIOL & MOL GEN
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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266 Medical Sciences C

Research Description

Our lab investigates the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in normal and abnormal physiology of the CNS, with two goals. The first is to determine how sodium channel mutations cause CNS disease. Specifically, we are studying the effects of epilepsy causing mutations in genes encoding human CNS sodium channels by using mouse models. The primary model is Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, which is caused by mutations in sodium channel subunits. We and our collaborators have constructed a number of mouse models expressing the sodium channel mutations that cause this disease. We are now using a variety of electrophysiological approaches to understand how the mutations alter excitability of individual neurons and the overall network. The second goal is to determine how different sodium channels localize in different regions of CNS neurons. There are multiple sodium channel isoforms, including four that are highly expressed in the CNS. These subtypes are present in different intracellular locations, and we are expressing tagged channels in neurons to identify the portions of the molecule that are important for the localization differences. In addition, we are examining the localization properties of the mutant channels that cause epilepsy to determine if those alterations affect trafficking.

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Biochemistry/Chemistry and Neuroscience

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

Minumum 6

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort, Attendance, Quality of Work.
Goulding, Celia
Lab Contact:
Celia Goulding
celia.goulding@uci.edu
(949) 824-0337
A TB STRUCT GENOMICS
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A

Research Description

My research is based on structure-function determination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in the hope of finding novel anti-TB drug targets. The techniques that we utilize include X-ray crystallography, biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry. My main focus is on a mycobacterial iron up-take system that scavenges iron from humans in the form of heme, and then uptakes this heme to be broken down for iron usage either within the bacterial membrane or cytosol The student research projects may include cloning, protein expression and purification and crystallization trials initially. There will also be some protein-protein interaction experiments to carry out.

Requirements to Participate

Completion of Bio 194S (biosafety and ethics) is required and a basic course in biochemistry/chemistry would be preferable. Must be highly motivated

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/wk
Green, Michael T.
Lab Contact:
Michael Green
m.green@uci.edu
A UNDERGRAD RESEARCH
Department: Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
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560 Steinhaus

Research Description

Bioinorganic Chemistry — Experiment and Theory

Requirements to Participate

2 year commitment.
Green, Kim
Lab Contact:
Kim Green
kngreen@uci.edu
(949) 824-3859
A NEURODEGENERATION
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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3400 Biological Sciences 3.

Research Description

Research into the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, using a variety of tissue cultures and mouse models of the disease. In particular, 199 students will assist with analyzing tissue from cells and mice that have been treated with blockers of calcium channels, or with modulators of the inflammatory system.

Requirements to Participate

Bio Major, Junior or above

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance and competence.
Gross, Steven
Lab Contact:
Steven Gross
A BIO OF MOLEC MOTORS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Gupta, Ranjan
Lab Contact:
Winnie Palispis
wpalispi@uci.edu
A NERVE INJURY
Department: SOM - Orthopaedic Surgery
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Gillespie neuroscience research facility

Research Description

Our lab investigates the cellular and molecular changes in chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and spinal nerve root stenosis. These localized, peripheral neuropathies produce pain, altered sensation, and motor atrophy in millions of Americans each year. However, knowledge about the cascade of cellular and molecular events leading to injury is limited, as are the number of effective treatments for CNC patients. In addition, we investigate methods of improving outcomes after spinal cord injuries. Spinal cord injuries often result in paralysis or disrupted motor and sensory function, and are accompanied by altered sensations and pain perception. Exploration of therapeutic treatments at the molecular level is of utmost importance to helping patients regain daily function and quality of life. These twin areas of focus allow the PNRL to occupy a unique, cutting-edge position at the intersection of orthopaedics and neuroscience.

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore year or higher Must be independently motivated to learn Willing to work with rodents (will need to complete all animal training)

Grade Point Average

3.6

Time Commitment per Week

To enroll 5 units. Will require some time for weekly article reading and presentation.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be evaluated based on workmanship, commitment to learn, and fulfillment of lab requirements. Please visit our lab website for more information, lab alumni and news http://www.orthopaedicsurgery.uci.edu/lab/index.html
Gupta, Ranjan
Lab Contact:
Susan Demas
sdemas@uci.edu
714-456-7710
B ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY
Department: Orthopaedics
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UCIMC, Bldg. 55; Basement, Rm. 006

Research Description

Student assist in set up of equipment and instrumentation for surgical skills procedures as well as being able to observe surgical and arthroscopic procedures. They will be taught how to prepare cadaver specimens for procedures. At times they may assist in dividing specimens and identifying them. At times you will be asked to assist surgeons during procedures. Student will be expected to assist with cleanup of instrumentation and stations post lab. Reorganizing instruments and assisting with inventory of specimens and supplies will be required. Students may at times be asked to set up and assist with procedures involving rodents for microscopic procedures. Participants will be required to be available for weekend labs and occasionally evening labs when class schedule allows. Occasionally abstracts for lab Objectives which require recording evaluations to measure educational experience will be required. Instrumentation can be heavy. Most of the work time requires standing. Work can be physically demanding. This is an excellent opportunity for students interested in a career in medicine, specifically surgery.

Requirements to Participate

Minimum 1 ½ year commitment.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

10- 12 hrs per week. NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED: 3 - 4.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work. Team work attitude. Fulfillment of time commitment.
Guzowski, John
Lab Contact:
John Guzowski
A NEUROBIOLOGY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Halbout, Briac N/A N/A
Hawkins, Brad
Lab Contact:
Brad Hawkins
bhawkins@uci.edu
(949) 824-5384
A BIOGEOGRAPHY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Project involves a study of the global pattern of species diversity for birds.

Requirements to Participate

Students who work on project a second year are expected to conduct a small independent study related to the major project.

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 6
Hernandez, Sarah N/A N/A
Hertel, Klemens
Lab Contact:
Klemens Hertel
khertel@uci.edu
(949) 737-2074
A RNA SPLICING
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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Med Sci I, Rm C290

Research Description

With the completion of the human genome project, it has become clear that the sheer number of genes cannot account for the complexity of the human proteome. Among several proposed mechanisms, alternative pre-mRNA splicing is considered to be one of the most efficient and widespread avenues to generate multiple protein isoforms from individual genes. Research in the Hertel laboratory focuses on understanding the mechanisms that allow for the generation of alternative splicing patterns. Specifically, we are interested in gaining insights into the most critical step of generating mRNA diversity; the processes of splice-site selection and pairing.

Requirements to Participate

Knowledge of Molecular Biology

Time Commitment per Week

15 hours a week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Performance in laboratory, dedication to research, quarterly presentation on research progress.
Hicks, James
Lab Contact:
James Hicks
A COMP ANIMAL PHYSIOL
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
Holmes, Todd
Lab Contact:
Todd Holmes
tholmes@uci.edu
(949) 824-0006
A CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS
Department: SOM - Physiology & Biophysics
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D340 Medical Science I

Research Description

Circadian Rhythms. My laboratory has developed pioneering approaches for understanding neural circuits and whole animal behavior. We focus on unraveling the functional operations of neurons in vivo with the goal of understanding integrative neural function from molecules to behavior. Recently, we have discovered a novel phototransduction mechanism that occurs directly in neurons that rapidly modulates electrical excitability. Other recent projects include modeling human neurodegenerative diseases using Drosophila as a model system.

Requirements to Participate

Student interview; Freshman or Sophomore Standing Preferred; Must also commit summer hours. COURSE COMPLETION: BIO 194

Grade Point Average

3.5+ preferred

Time Commitment per Week

10 hour minimum

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Student presentation and Lab meeting attendance.
Hoonpongsimano, Wirachin
Lab Contact:
Wirachin Hoonpongsimano
whoonpon@uci.edu
(714) 456-5239
B EMRAP
Department: SOM - Emergency Medicine
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Emergency Department at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange, CA

Research Description

The Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program (EMRAP) is a clinical research program at the UCI Medical Center in Orange, CA. Founded by Dr. Federico Vaca in 1997, EMRAP provides undergraduates with a unique opportunity to contribute directly to research projects in the Emergency Department and Level 1 Trauma Center through first-hand experience with patient interaction and close faculty mentorship from the UCI School of Medicine. During each four-hour shift, students interface with patients, families, and physicians to obtain consent and collect data for multiple studies, with tasks ranging from performing ultrasound imaging on patients to providing a computerized alcohol screening and brief intervention to trauma victims. Research associates also gain knowledge in the methodology of clinical and epidemiological research through a parallel Academic Program, led by EMRAP Director Dr. Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont. While participating in EMRAP, students can pursue leadership opportunities by serving as ?liaisons? for chosen projects and thereby play a key role in the implementation and integrity of research protocol for that study. All EMRAP associates are encouraged to take full advantage of UCI's extensive undergraduate research opportunities, from applying to grant funding from the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program to presenting their results through the School of Biological Sciences Excellence in Research program. In addition to being an integral part of the workings of the Department of Emergency Medicine, EMRAP strives to prepare students as future leaders and healthcare professionals and to foster greater understanding of clinical emergency medicine and our community's public health needs.

Requirements to Participate

current UCI undergraduate or post-baccalaureate student, standard Bio 199 prerequisites, minimum one-year commitment (including summer and breaks between academic terms).

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

4-hour weekly shift / unit and Monday evening research meetings at UCI Medical Center.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, participation, professionalism, and fulfillment of liaison duties, if applicable.
Hoshi, Naoto
Lab Contact:
Naoto Hoshi
nhoshi@uci.edu
(949) 824-0970
A CHANNEL & RECEPTOR
Department: SOM - Pharmacology
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309 Med Surge II

Research Description

We study how protein complexes regulate ion channels. Students will have opportunity to participate in experiments covering various aspects of pharmacological research: molecular (cloning) and cellular (cell culture) biology (western blot) and electrophysiology (if desire).

Requirements to Participate

Students interested in pharmacological/pharmaceutical research; Preference to those with experience in biological and/or chemical techniques. COURSE COMPLETION: Course requirements vary by project.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

8+
Hu, Yilin
Lab Contact:
Yilin Hu
yilinh@uci.edu
949-824-4615
A Microbial Biochem
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemisty
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2346 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

The Hu lab investigates enzyme systems that are involved in biosynthetic pathways related to photosynthesis, methanogenesis and nitrogen fixation. These efforts aim at establishing an evolutionary link between nitrogen fixation, methanogenesis and photosynthesis from a biochemical perspective, as well as developing strategies for environmental and industrial applications of these processes based on the intrinsic homology among these enzyme systems.

Requirements to Participate

Bio 98 required, M122 preferred. (1) Adhere to time commitment; (2) Perform assigned experiments; and (3) Understand the scientific background pertinent to the assigned experiments.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

3-4 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Level of performance based on the requirement to complete the course (see above)
Huang, Lan
Lab Contact:
Lan Huang
lanhuang@uci.edu
(949) 824-8548
A MASS/SPEC/PROTEOMIC
Department: SOM - Physiology & Biophysics
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N/A

Research Description

Our research focuses on developing and employing mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches to answer a series of biological questions related to cancer diagnostics and treatment. Current projects include characterization of proteasome complex composition, their post-translational modifications and mapping protein interacting network in normal and cancer cells; investigation of protein ubiquitination and ubiquitin-like protein modifications to understand their functions in turmorigenesis.

Requirements to Participate

Completion of organic chemistry, cell biology, biochemistry.

Grade Point Average

3
Huang, Susan
Lab Contact:
Susan Huang
sshuang@uci.edu
B CLINICAL INFECTIONS
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A

Research Description

Dr. Huang is an infectious diseases specialist and epidemiologist whose research focuses on the clinical epidemiology of healthcare-associated infections, including highly antibiotic-resistant organisms, device-associated infections, outbreak detection, and others. She is an Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases and the Medical Director of Epidemiology and Infection Prevention at the UC Irvine Medical Center. Her research involves assessing the risk for infection, predictors of disease, and value of prevention strategies. Her scope of research also includes an evaluation of inter-facility spread and containment of these pathogens, including the intersection of preventative measures on hospital networks, affiliated nursing homes, and surrounding communities. She has evaluated several strategies to mitigate transmission and disease, including large clinical trials. Student projects would involve smaller projects in which they can demonstrate some independence and excellence. These could involve assisting with surveys, chart review projects, evaluating questions in large state or national datasets, or performing secondary analyses of trial data. If interested, please email resume and request for interview to sshuang@uci.edu

Requirements to Participate

Must submit resume and schedule in person interview to assess mutual interests, expectations, and commitment. Student experience will be best if interest is assessed several months before the start of the course since successful and on-time start requires completion of required human subjects tutorials so that the student can be added to human subjects protocols. In many cases, no activities can commence without addition to IRB protocols which can take up to a month to occur.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Intellectual contribution, weekly progress, completion of project
Hughes, Bradley
Lab Contact:
Bradley Hughes
bhughes@uci.edu
(949) 502-6374
A CINE PROD RESEARCH
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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SH 341, 347, some research work off-campus (on location)

Research Description

Gain valuable hands-on experience as a member of the Hughes Cinematic Media Productions Lab Crew working with Ultra HD Video Cinema equipment, production software (Adobe Creative Cloud), and state of the art editing, while shooting on various campus and community locations to produce videos from Artistic Entertainment to showcasing scientific breakthrough high tech innovations for distributions from theatrical release to mobile apps.

Requirements to Participate

Candidates are required to be willing to learn and apply the practices of videography from pre to post production. Additionally, candidates need to be able to learn and array of audio video workflows, acting techniques, directorial procedures, along with introductory level usage of laboratory equipment, while possessing good organizational skills and ability to carry out safe lab practices are strongly desired. COURSE COMPLETION: To be determined by instructor on individual basis. (Additional units available by request) OTHER: May include field trips.

Grade Point Average

2.7 minimum

Time Commitment per Week

4 hours a week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Combined informal and performance based assessment by graduate student and instructor to determine candidate's ability to independently and successfully participate in their chosen or assigned research project.
Hughes, Christopher
Lab Contact:
Christopher Hughes
cchughes@uci.edu
949-824-8143
A VASCULAR BIOLOGY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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Bio. Sci III

Research Description

We study how blood vessels are formed and how they function. We are particularly interested in their role in tumor growth. Our lab uses various in vitro models including various body- and organ-on-a-chip platforms that we are developing.

Grade Point Average

2.8

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time). Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety). Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through).
Hunt, Robert
Lab Contact:
Robert Hunt
robert.hunt@uci.edu
949-824-7079
A Neurobiology
Department: Anatomy & Neurobiology
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Irvine Hall / Gross Hall

Research Description

Our work focuses largely on a group of nerve cells called inhibitory interneurons. We study how these cells develop, how they operate at the circuit and behavioral level and how they are disrupted in disorders of cortical development such as epilepsy. We have been analyzing mice with gene mutations linked to epilepsy in children and are beginning to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from human patients. The lab also has an interest in cell-based approaches to rewire the nervous system for epilepsy therapy.

Requirements to Participate

Preference will be given to those with strong interest in neuroscience research and desire for a multi-quarter commitment. Students will complete all lab safety training and attend lab meetings. In the final week of the quarter, students will submit a brief, 1-2 pg description of research completed and give a 15 minute presentation on their work during lab meeting.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

10+ hrs / wk and lab meetings

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and effort committed to the project
Huxman, Travis
Lab Contact:
Travis Huxman
thuxman@uci.edu
(949) 824-2594
A PLANT ECOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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Steinhaus Hall 429

Research Description

The Huxman laboratory focuses on understanding the evolution of functional traits in plants and how plants influence ecosystem processes. A primary focus are questions that relate to understanding stress tolerance and growth potential in native plants, how environmental factors affect primary production, how plants influence the water cycle and affect the physical environment, and how either disturbance, human influence or global change may affect these processes. Student projects may focus on laboratory, growth chamber, or greenhouse studies, field and common garden experiments, and/or data synthesis, analysis or model assimilation. Field work may include projects associated with the Center for Environmental Biology on local UC Reserve lands, Orange County Open Space, State Parks or in the National Forest. Summer and academic year positions are available.

Requirements to Participate

Students will develop independent projects. Students will also be expected to participate in laboratory / Center meetings and activities.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students are evaluated on quality of work, initiative, and the development of research activities through the experience
Igarashi, Kei
Lab Contact:
Kei Igarashi
kei.igarashi@uci.edu
949-824-4673
A NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
Department: Anatomy & Neurobiology
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Irvine Hall

Research Description

Our work focuses largely on recording neuronal activities while rats and mice are performing odor-cued memory tasks. We study how information carried by the neurons generate behaviors. The routine works in the lab includes animal training, construction of miniature recording apparatus under microscopes, animal surgeries, recording neuronal activities, histological analysis of the brain and computational analyses of recorded data using Matlab.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

At least 1 year commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and effort committed to the project.
Imagawa, David
Lab Contact:
Maki Yamamoto
myamamot@uci.edu
(714) 456-3885
B SURGERY
Department: SOM - Surgery
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101 The City Drive South Bldg 56 Room 202 Orange, CA 92868

Research Description

The Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery involves examination of various conditions and treatments affecting diseases of the liver, pancreas, and biliary tree. Students will be expected to attend weekly clinics on Monday mornings and Thursday afternoons, as well as work independently in the office. Student tasks will include maintaining the research database, statistical analysis, and other research duties as necessary. Ability to learn new applications. Experience with Excel, Access, SPSS, Adobe Premiere, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator preferred. Must be willing to travel to medical center. Student will be supervised by the PI and the surgical research resident.

Requirements to Participate

sophomore standing

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12 hours/week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work, fulfillment of time commitment
Inlay, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Matthew Inlay
minlay@uci.edu
A HEMATOPOIESIS
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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1100 Gross Hall

Research Description

My lab’s research interests span Developmental Biology, Stem Cell Biology, and Immunology. My primary research focus is on the developmental origins of the stem cell that gives rise to all blood and immune cells, called the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). We use mouse models to identify precursors to HSCs in the developing embryo, when and where they arise, and the external signals and gene expression programs that regulate HSC emergence. The techniques we employ include fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), fluorescent microscopy, live and time-lapse imaging, mouse embryo culture, and transplantation into immunodeficient recipient mice. We hope to use this information to aid efforts to generate functional HSCs from human pluripotent stem cell lines (PSCs) to treat human blood diseases and disorders. A portion of my lab works with human PSC lines to differentiate these cells to hematopoietic lineages in culture to apply the concepts we learn in the mouse. A secondary focus of lab is on the developmental origin of microglia, which are the primary immune cell of the central nervous system. In this context, we are interested in which cells and tissues in the embryo produce microglia, and what role microglial dysfunction plays in neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. We are identifying novel biomarkers for microglia to examine their function in mouse and human samples. Students who perform Bio199 sections in my lab will be expected to commit to over one year (preferably 2+ years) of research in the lab, and dedicate at least 10 hours per week of study. Students who can also commit to research over the summer are also preferred. A GPA above 3.0 is required, but higher GPAs are preferred. Freshmen and sophomores with strong academic records are particularly encouraged to apply. In order to be accepted into the lab, prospective students will need to be sponsored by a full time lab member (grad student or post-doc), who will agree to mentor the student. Thus, prospective students will need to first meet with me and my full time lab members.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, work ethic, and attitude.
Ivy, Autumn Skye
Lab Contact:
Autumn Ivy
aivy@uci.edu
949-824-2417
A EXERCISE EPIGENOME
Department: Department of Pediatrics
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Med Sci D (Cheney Hall) Room D0330

Research Description

Using mouse models, our lab studies the effects of early-life exercise on brain development and function. We focus on the discovery of epigenetic mechanisms that may influence neuronal function and cognitive outcomes in a lasting manner.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Faculty Means of Evaluation

BioSci199 students will be evaluated on their attendance and participation in lab responsibilities assigned to them. It is expected that they will be on time, document their research experiments and data, follow through with assignments, and complete reading tasks for participation in journal club and lab meetings. Students will be evaluated by staff scientists, graduate students, and/or the principal investigator.
IYER, SONALI LAKSHMAN N/A N/A
Jafari, Mahtab
Lab Contact:
Mahtab Jafari
mjafari@uci.edu
(949) 824-0145
A PHARMACOLOGY RESRCH
Department: SOM - Pharmaceutical Sciences
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N/A

Research Description

The use of animal models for screening and evaluating anti-aging pharmaceutical and botanical compounds is a promising approach for drug discovery. While testing anti-aging compounds using the premier animal genetic systems, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, has already started, the fundamental biological issues involved in such screening have not been systematically formulated. As a result, after selecting potential anti-aging compounds to be tested, we need appropriate methodologies to study the pharmacology of aging in model species. Once these methodologies or rules of investigation are developed, we may consider extrapolating these experimental findings with such systems to the treatment of human aging. However, there are a number of potential artifacts, confounds, and errors that can arise in such research programs. In order to minimize these problems, I developed the following assays as the rules of investigation in anti-aging pharmacology and am in the process of applying them to a number of potential anti-aging compounds. These are the rules of investigation that I propose: Since human adulthood is almost exclusively a period of aging, data that conflate aging and late life should not be extrapolated to human aging. 2) The response to candidate medications should show a normal drug-dose response pattern, although not necessarily a linear response. 3) Medicated animal models should not be hypometabolic. 4) Medicated animal models should not show pronounced reductions in fertility. 5) Medicated animal models should not exhibit general nervous system depression. 6) The effect of the medication should not be highly sensitive to the culture environment. 7) The effect of the medication should not be highly dependent on the genetic ancestry of the stock employed, leaving aside inbreeding, which should be avoided because humans are not generally inbred. While these rules do not guarantee successful extrapolation of successful drug results from the animal model to humans in a clinical setting, the failure to adhere to these rules should raise doubts about such extrapolation. In my research, I attempt to address this task. Interest in a career in biomedical research is required.

Requirements to Participate

All students start as Bio. 198, group research students. Progress to Bio. 199 status depends on the student's ability to work independently. NO student begins in the Bio. 199 course. Must be highly motivated to complete an independent project while working closely with the research staff and PI. Biology and Chemistry

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

A 2-year commitment and a desire to apply for a UROP grant, SURP fellowship, and Excellence in Research is recommended
James, Anthony
Lab Contact:
Anthony James
aajames@uci.edu
(949) 824-5930, 3210
A MOLEC BIO/MALARIA
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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McGaugh Hall
Jester, James
Lab Contact:
James Jester
jjester@uci.edu
(949) 824-8047
A OCULAR BIOMECHANICS
Department: SOM - Ophthalmology
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Hewitt Hall, Building 843

Research Description

Research focuses on the cell and molecular biology of ocular surface and corneal disease of the eye with an interest in corneal biomechanics and ocular imaging using non-linear optical microscopy. Studies range from cell culture to animal experimentation and ex vivo examination of the eye. REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: An interest in cell and molecular biology or bioengineering.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

8

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be graded on laboratory attendance, quality of research data and analysis generated and the ability to present work at laboratory meetings.
Jiang, Luohua
Lab Contact:
Luohua Jiang
lhjiang@uci.edu
949-824-7325
B DISEASE PREVENTION
Department: Epidemiology
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205B Irvine Hall

Research Description

Dr. Jiang's primary research interests are chronic diseases epidemiology and prevention as well as health disparities research. In particular, she has been working in the field of translating evidence-based diabetes prevention and management interventions into large-scale public health practice among minority populations. In this course, the 199 students will work on a project on preventing diabetes and its complications among underserved populations. They may also have the opportunity to study biostatistical methods used in prevention research.

Requirements to Participate

1 year Commitment

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit; Minimum 2 units; 1 year Commitment

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work, responsibility, data collection, initiative, and overall enthusiasm for research
Jiang, Sunny
Lab Contact:
Sunny Jiang
sjiang@uci.edu
(949) 824-5527
A MARINE MICRO & ECOL
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Research in Dr. Jiang's lab focuses on the following three areas: 1) aquatic/marine microbial ecology, 2) water quality microbiology, 3) epidemiology of exposure to recreational waters. Her group uses molecular method to uncover the genomes and interaction of organisms in the environment. Over the past decade, her team has developed rapid and sensitive methods for detection and quantification of human virus contamination in aquatic samples. Their results have suggested that current coastal water standards do not adequately reflect the viral quality of recreational waters. Working together with environmental engineers, coastal physical oceanographers and remote sensing scientists, they have recently discovered that surf zone water quality is impacted by multiple factors including global climate changes, land use patterns and human activities. Working directly with the City of Newport Beach and Regional Water Quality Control Board, they have investigated the relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and human viruses in Newport Bay. The results showed that the occurrence of these two types of organisms is uncoupled largely due to the differences in the source and survival of each type. Another area of her research addresses human health risk from exposure to coastal waters. Her research group is currently developing web-based survey tools to understand the relationship between human health risk and coastal water quality. Sample projects in her lab include investigation the causes and decline of harmful algal blooms (red tides), detection of pathogens in water, epidemiological surveillance of recreational illnesses.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be prepared to develop independent projects. Students will be expected to participate in lab activities and meetings.

Time Commitment per Week

10+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be based on time committed to the project and the quality of research.
Jin, Rongsheng
Lab Contact:
Rongsheng Jin
r.jin@uci.edu
949-824-6580
A STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY
Department: Physiology & Biophysics
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Medical Science I, C-322

Research Description

Our research focuses on the structure and function of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which are among the most poisonous substances known to man. BoNTs therefore represent a major bioterrorist threat. Paradoxically, BoNT-containing medicines and cosmetics have been used with great success in clinic. Both the toxic and therapeutic functions of BoNTs indeed rely on a common mechanism to enter neurons, cleave proteins that mediate release of key neurotransmitters, and subsequently paralyze the affected muscles. We are trying to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the BoNT-host interplay during the course of intoxication. A second area of our research concerns the structural and functional characterization of ion channels, receptors, and signaling molecules in the nervous system. The brain is a massive network of neurons that communicate with each other by signal transmission at synapses. We are interested in mechanisms of synapse formation, neurotransmission, and synaptic plasticity. These studies will facilitate the design and improvement of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychological and neurological disorders. The students will learn basic techniques in molecular cloning, protein expression, purification, and characterization. The students will also have the opportunity to observe and/or participate in high-throughput crystallization screening, remote synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies, and structure determination and analysis.

Requirements to Participate

Preference to those with basic experience in biochemistry and/or molecular biology.

Grade Point Average

3+

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hours

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, responsibility, research performance
JUNG, KWANG M N/A N/A
Kadandale, Pavan
Lab Contact:
Pavan Kadandale
pavan.k@uci.edu
(949) 824-8362
A BIOLOGY EDUCATION
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A

Research Description

My research is focused on how to get students excited about Biology, how to get them to learn better, and how to improve their ability to think critically and analyze data. I am also interested in how to build communities of student learners, and what impacts such communities have on student learning and motivation. As part of my group, you are expected to commit to doing as much work as is required, although for the most part the schedule is pretty flexible.

Requirements to Participate

Most importantly, you are expected to be self-motivated, and not afraid of deep thinking. As an undergraduate researcher, you can expect to read and analyze papers related to the current status of education research, and techniques that improve learning. You will contribute ideas on how to change Biology education at UCI, come up with ideas to increase learning, and be part of a team that assesses the efficacy of these changes in the classroom.

Time Commitment per Week

The hours are variable, but will typically be in the range of 4-10 hours per week.
Kaiser, Peter
Lab Contact:
Peter Kaiser
pkaiser@uci.edu
(949) 824-9442
A UBIQUITIN PATHWAY
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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Hitachi (Plumwood) Building room 136

Research Description

Research in the Kaiser laboratory aims to (i) investigate fundamental mechanistic questions about cell cycle control and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, (ii) discover molecularpathways suitable for the development of novel strategies in cancer therapy, and (iii) develop novel approaches to directed drug design, which we apply to develop small molecules to reactivate mutant p53 in human cancer

Time Commitment per Week

8 hours/week minimum
Kawas, Claudia
Lab Contact:
Dana Greenia
dgreenia@uci.edu
949 824-4459
A CLINICAL STUDY
Department: SOM - Neurology
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The location is Hewitt Hall, and off campus site: Clinic for Aging Research and Education 24361 El Toro Road, #150 Laguna Woods, CA 92637

Research Description

Have you ever wondered how people live past 100? Or why some people get Alzheimer’s disease when others are spared? The 90+ Study is a longitudinal study of aging and dementia that focuses on the brain changes associated with extreme aging and the factors that can increase or decrease dementia risk. Work in the study is primarily done off campus. Students will do clerical tasks such as filing, scanning documents and data entry, while getting exposure to clinical research. You are responsible for your own transportation to and from the office in Laguna Woods (about 20 minutes south of the UCI campus).

Requirements to Participate

COMPLETION: Bio 194 and Bio Sci 94 GRADE POINT AVERAGE: 3.4 or better TIME COMMITMENT PER WEEK: 9 hours minimum NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED: 3 units minimum OTHER: Sophomores preferred so that the experience can progress over a few quarters FACULTY MEANS OF EVALUATION FOR COURSE GRADE: You will be evaluated based on your performance, punctuality, and attendance.
Keirstead, Hans
Lab Contact:
Hans Keirstead
hansk@uci.edu
(949) 824-6213
A SPINAL CORD REGEN
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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Gross Hall, School of Medicine, Keirstead Research Group

Research Description

Bio199 students within the Keirstead lab take part in a variety of different tasks ranging from assisting in surgical procedures such as spinal cord contusion injuries, and intra spinal cellular transplantations to tissue processing, immunohistochemistry and data analysis. Students will often find themselves conducting behavioral tests, summarizing the data into Excel spreadsheets, performing routine post-op animal care and monitoring. These tasks may include administering saline and antibiotic injections intraperitoneally or subcutaneously, daily injections with an immunosuppressant drug, and the quantitative analysis of animal kinematics by analyzing videotaped images. Research will also include tissue dissection, cryostat sectioning, and numerous molecular biology techniques that may include DNA concentration, PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme digestion along with the preparation of cell culture media and gels.

Requirements to Participate

Students must be highly motivated. Experience in the following areas would be appreciated but not necessary: cryostat cutting and immunological staining, previous animal handling experience or willingness to work with live animals, and previous academic course work in the neurobiology/biology field.

Time Commitment per Week

Students will be expected to dedicate an average of 12-15 hours per week, and must be willing to work on weekends on occasion
KELLY, KRISTEN M N/A N/A
Kenney, Maria
Lab Contact:
Marian Kenney
A OPHTHALMOLOGY
Department: SOM - Ophthalmology
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N/A
Kessenbrock, Kai
Lab Contact:
Kai Kessenbrock
Kkessenb@uci.edu
415-994-0012
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Biological Chemistry
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140 Sprague Hall

Research Description

We study cellular communication in the context of epithelial stem cell regulation and in breast cancer to ultimately improve methods of early detection, cancer treatment and potentially cancer prevention. REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: Background in biology, motivation to carry out research in a thorough and safe manner, fulfillment of time commitment, participation at lab group meetings and journal clubs, and general enthusiasm to join a young collaborative team effort.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 2 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 45Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety) Communication: 15Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor) Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through) Total: 100 points
Keyak, Joyce
Lab Contact:
Joyce Keyak
jhkeyak@uci.edu
(949) 824-9421
A BONE RESEARCH
Department: SOM - Radiological Sciences
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N/A

Research Description

Currently not accepting new students. Research involving the evaluation and/or treatment of osteoporosis or metastatic bone disease on a macroscopic, mechanical level. Microscopic or chemical techniques (e.g. gels) are generally not part of this research. Work with cadavers and/or radioactivity may be required.
Khoury, Antoine
Lab Contact:
Randi McNulty
mcnultyr@uci.edu
714-509-3914
B PEDIATRIC UROLOGY
Department: SOM - Urology
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UCI Medical Center and CHOC Orange, CA.

Research Description

Research internship under the direction of Dr. Antoine Khoury at CHOC Children's Urology Center. This is an unpaid internship seeking candidates that can work a minimum of 8-10 hours per week for a duration of 3-12 months. Intern positions are open to those students obtaining course credit. The proposed scope is to gain hands on experience in the field of pediatric and adolescent urology research. Goals of pediatric urology research include finding appropriate and innovative treatment plans for common pediatric urological conditions (such as vesicoureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, and hypospadias). In addition, we aim to compare current surgical and medical care of varying conditions using current accepted patient care standards and making improvements through more cost effective and efficient means without jeopardizing the success of the outcome of care. Interns will participate in research activities such as data collection, literature review, and document preparation to be used in protocol development, publications, and/or presentation. Interns will have the opportunity to interface with practitioners (attendings, fellows, nurses, and other students). Interns are expected to attend weekly urology research rounds and participate in presentation on their related research projects.

Requirements to Participate

Looking for students interested in learning more about pediatric urology and basic and clinical research tools.

Grade Point Average

3.25

Time Commitment per Week

3+ hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, quality of contributions, and peer-evaluation from other lab team members.
Kimonis, Virginia
Lab Contact:
Virginia Kimonis
vkimonis@uci.edu
(714) 456-5791 or (949) 824-0571
B VCP-IBMPFD
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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Hewitt Hall, Irvine and Tower Bldg, Orange

Research Description

Dr. Virginia Kimonis is the new chief of the Division of Genetics and Metabolism in the Department of Pediatrics at UCI. While involved in many aspects of clinical genetics and clinical research (multicenter clinical NIH studies involving natural history and genotype- phenotype studies in Prader-Willi and Craniosynostosis syndromes), she has an international reputation for her clinical and laboratory research work in inherited muscle diseases that occur in combination with diseases of bone and/or dementia (also known as IBMPFD) Her group localized the gene for the disorder to chromosome 9, identified the causal gene as VCP (CDC48 or p97) and are now identifying the key pathways and functions that are disrupted by the mutations they have found in the affected families. They are also developing a knock-in animal model of the disorder and are working on developing better clinical evaluations, diagnostic testing and treatments for families with IBMPFD, but also for those with other sporadic and hereditary diseases that share components of IBMPFD.
Kitazawa, Masashi
Lab Contact:
Masashi Kitazawa
kitazawa@uci.edu
949-824-1255
A NEUROTOXICOLOGY
Department: Medicine
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2216 Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility

Research Description

Research into the understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer disease and other age-related dementia, with particular interest in the involvement of environmental risk factors, such as metals and air pollution, and how these factors disturb innate inflammatory homeostasis, leading to the disease onset and progression. We will use a variety of tissue cultures and mouse models for our research. Bio199 students will assist with processing and analyzing tissue from cells and mice that have been exposed to environmental contaminants, or treated with potential therapeutic compounds that ameliorate inflammation.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit Minimum 3 units

Grade Point Average

3.2

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, commitment to the project, and quality of work
Klassen, Henry
Lab Contact:
Henry Klassen
A RETINAL STEM CELL
Department: SOM - Ophthalmology
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N/A
Kleinman, Michael
Lab Contact:
Samantha Renusch
srenusch@uci.edu
A COMM & ENVIRON MED
Department: SOM - Community & Environmental Medicine
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APHEL
Kong, Allen
Lab Contact:
Allen Kong
konga@uci.edu
(714) 456-5890
B TRAUMA
Department: SOM - Surgery
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UCI Medical Center

Research Description

Trauma Research Associates Program (T-RAP) _ The T-RAP is a newly created program that is focused on facilitating clinical research in the Department of Surgery's Division of Trauma/Critical Care/Burns at the University of California Irvine Medical Center (UCIMC) in Orange. T-RAP provides undergraduate students first hand exposure to clinical research in Orange County's only Level-1 Trauma and Burn Center. The T-RAP experience involves a unique blend of first-hand clinical exposure and scientific research, which should serve useful when applying to medical (allopathic and osteopathic), dental, pharmacy, physician assistant and public health programs around the country. Research associates become well versed in the workings of trauma surgery and critical care as well as patient communication and education. Provides opportunities to watch surgical procedures and attend medical rounds with doctors.

Requirements to Participate

Students will be required to attend mandatory Friday meetings at the UCIMC from 12:30-2 PM.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

4 hours/unit per week (3-4 units)
Kumar Parihar, Vipan
Lab Contact:
Vipan Parihar
vipank@uci.edu
9498247395
A NEURO - STEM CELLS
Department: Radiation Oncology
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Med. Science # 1, Lab B110

Research Description

The long-term goal of my research is to understand CNS risks following space radiation. Central areas of investigation include following: 1) to elucidate whether radiation-induced cognitive decrement is associated with reduced spine density and dendritic complexity. 2) To study epigenetic changes following space radiation.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit.
Kwon, Young Jik
Lab Contact:
Young Jik Kwon
kwonyj@uci.edu
(949) 824-8714
A NANOBIOTECH
Department: SOM - Pharmaceutical Sciences
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Engineering Tower 944F

Research Description

Timely, complete, and convenient treatment of many diseases is not yet within reach, although many potent therapeutics have been identified and developed. Successful delivery of therapeutics depends on finding paths toward ideal forms of treatment. In BioTherapeutics Engineering Laboratory (BioTEL) in departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Chemical Engineering and Materials Science tackles this problem by identifying the limitations of current therapeutics and the reasons for those limitations. Target therapeutics are then selected and conjugated in the form of micro- and nanoparticles, using organic chemistry and carrier fabrication tools. BioTEL is currently working to develop drug delivery systems that selectively localize therapeutics in the body, down to the level of cellular compartments, and offer controlled release of therapeutics so that drugs can be delivered only at the desired time. BioTEL employs techniques to immobilize therapeutics, including cancer chemotherapy agents, imaging probes, therapeutic genes and proteins, and cells. Once carriers are localized in a target site through passive and active targeting mechanisms, therapeutics can be triggered to be active by pathological signals. Synthesis of novel carrier materials, innovative fabrication of carriers, elucidation of extracellular and intracellular behaviors of drug/carriers, and development of new drug release mechanisms are the key scientific emphases in BioTEL. Opportunities for undergraduate researchers including nanocarrier synthesis and characterization as well as in vitro and in vivo tests, depending on needs in the lab and qualification of participants

Requirements to Participate

Basic molecular biology and organic chemistry COURSE COMPLETION: Sophomore and juniors are ideal but seniors with previous experience will also be considered. OTHER: Students with intention of a long-term participation will be given high priority. FACULTY MEANS OF EVALUATION FOR COURSE GRADE: Written reports, literature review, presentation in the group meeting, evaluations from graduate co-workers.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 10 hrs spread through weekdays and weekends
Laferla, Frank
Lab Contact:
Frank Laferla
A MOLEC NEUROPATH
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Laferla, Frank
Lab Contact:
Shirley Sirivong
leyley@uci.edu
(949) 824-8135
B ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
Department: Neurobiology and Behavior
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1100 Gottschalk Medical Plaza

Research Description

The UCI Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) was officially established in 2000 and is one of several multi-disciplinary and multi-investigator grants administered by the Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders. The mission of the UCI ADRC is to encourage multidisciplinary basic, clinical, and behavioral research in Alzheimer’s disease and translate findings into practice. As part of this mission, the ADRC trains scientists and health care providers who are new to Alzheimer’s disease research and provides education about Alzheimer’s disease and the related dementias throughout the community. As Orange County’s only federally funded Alzheimer’s disease center, UCI ADRC seeks to translate research advances into improved diagnosis, treatment, and care for people living with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia today and ultimately find a way to cure and possibly prevent these conditions. Our goals are to: • Describe the cognitive and underlying brain changes that differentiate normal aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease • Investigate ways to identify, diagnose, and treat Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders • Better understand cognitive aging in special populations, including the oldest old and persons with Down syndrome • Engage older adults in a variety of studies on memory and aging • Serve as the expert source of information on memory and aging for Orange County seniors, health care professionals, and aging service providers, as well as the community at large. Students interested in this clinical research opportunity will be engaged in human subject research within the UCI ADRC. Students will gain experience in the process of collecting patient information in clinical studies and with this direct patient interaction.

Requirements to Participate

Genuine interest in entering the medical or clinical research field. Interest in working with older adult population.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 8-10 hrs/wk, and willing to commit to at least 1-2 years

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, participation, data collection, professionalism, and quality of work.
Lakes, Kimberly
Lab Contact:
Kimberly Lakes
klakes@uci.edu
(949) 824-3009
B AUTISM & ADHD
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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101 Academy Way, Suite 150 Irvine 92617

Research Description

The National Children's Study (NCS: www.nationalchildrensstudy.gov) is an observational, longitudinal, community-based population study that will examine the effects of environmental and genetic influences on the health and development of more than 100,000 children across the United States, following them from before birth until age 21. UC Irvine has been awarded a contract to establish a Vanguard Center (a pilot center for the NCS to develop and test the methods for the national study) and conduct the study in Orange County, and contracts to also establish study centers in San Diego County (Wave 1) and San Bernardino County and Kern County (Wave 2), which will follow the Vanguard Center by a year or more. The goal of the study is to improve our understanding of complex interacting processes underlying child development, health, and disease. The study defines ?environment? broadly and will take a number of factors into account, including: ? Natural and man-made environmental factors ? Biological and chemical factors ? Physical surroundings ? Social factors ? Behavioral influences and outcomes ? Cultural and family influences and differences ? Geographic locations Researchers will analyze the manner in which these factors interact among themselves, and their individual and cumulative influences on children's health. Studying children over all phases of growth and development will enable researchers to understand the roles of multiple factors on child development, health, and disease. As major discoveries are made throughout the implementation of the study, these findings will be shared with the public. Researchers believe that the NCS will become a rich informational resource for many scientific studies of child health, development, and disease whose results will likely inform future policies and interventions. In April 2009, the NCS launched in Orange County by beginning to go door-to-door in an attempt to find women who are pregnant or might become pregnant in the next 5 years. Our current research efforts are focused on community engagement and recruitment. In addition, we are involved in studies such as: how to evaluate 3-year old children for Autism, screening parents for mental health disorders, and ethical issues related to child participation in genomic research. Student researchers are expected to spend 50% of their time participating directly in community research (through outreach or formative research). Research assignments are based on a number of factors, including student availability and skills as well as project needs. Examples of current activities for student researchers include: ? Participation in community outreach, including attendance at community events, distribution of materials about the study in the community, and screening potential participants. ? Participation in outreach to the medical community. This may include contacting and distributing study materials to medical practices in the community, analyzing data related to the distribution of births across providers in targeted communities, etc. ? Assistance with formative research study involving qualitative data collection (via focus groups and interviews) in the communities. Students will attend and observe focus groups and/or interviews, assisting with data collection. Students will assist with the transcription of meetings and will participate in data analysis and write-up. ? Assistance with formative research studies. Examples of current studies include: how to evaluate 3-year old children for Autism, screening parents for mental health disorders, and ethical issues related to child participation in genomic research.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

8 to 10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

? Completion of the UCI IRB Human Subjects and HIPPA tutorials. ? Completion of the NCS Research Training. ? Reading provided NCS materials and conducting related literature searches. ? Reliability and consistency in attendance and documented completion of required hours. ? Progress on/contributions to research assignments. ? Participation in weekly meetings with research staff.
Lakey, Jonathan
Lab Contact:
Jonathan Lakey
jlakey@uci.edu
(714) 456-3978
B SURGICAL RESEARCH
Department: SOM - Surgery
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UCI Medical Center bldg 55 rm 160

Research Description

The focus of my research laboratory is cell and tissue transplantation with specific focus on the transplantation of pancreatic islet cells for those people with insulin dependent diabetes (type I). Over the past few years there have been significant and important advances in the method of human islet isolation allowing the transplantation of isolated islets into patients with longstanding diabetes. Our goal is to develop a clinical islet transplant program at the University of California, Irvine. Additionally, we have an active research program investigating aspects of islet isolation including enzymatic means of tissue dissociation, examining cell tissue energetics and novel methods of validating islet yield and function. To address the key issue of tissue rejection and the need for chronic anti-rejection drugs, we are working with an industrial partner on developing a clinical islet encapsulation program using biocompatible alginate. It is hoped that these pre-clinical transplants and biochemical studies will lead to clinical trials in patients with diabetes.

Requirements to Participate

General background in biology/biochemistry/immunology. Previous lab courses in biology is strongly recommended. Strong motivation, enthusiasm, good organizational skills, quick study and receptive to taking work direction and working in a team environment. Presentation at scientific meetings along with submission of findings to scientific journals will be encouraged. Completion of core through Bio 99 with a grade of B or higher, completion of Bio 194S Safety, consent of instructor.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12 to 20 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Weekly task sign-off sheet and evaluation from staff members in the lab.
Lander, Arthur
Lab Contact:
Arthur Lander
adlander@uci.edu
(949) 824-1721
A DEVEL NEUROBIOLOGY
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Role of proteoglycans in mouse brain development. This research is to study the development of the mammalian brain by analyzing mutant mice. The lab has made mutants that lack a proteoglycan, glypican _ 1, and which are deficient in brain growth. The goal is to determine what cellular signals are disrupted by this mutation. Methods will include tissue histology, molecular biology, and mouse genetics. Learning how proteoglycans affect brain development in mice will ultimately contribute to the understanding of human birth defects and diseases

Requirements to Participate

Preferably has junior standing (but will consider sophomores with excellent grades), and is interested in continuation of this project in future quarters.

Grade Point Average

3.4

Time Commitment per Week

10
Landman, Jamie
Lab Contact:
Renai Yoon or Christina Hwang
yoonrh@uci.edu or cdhwang@uci.edu
(714) 456-6481 or (714) 456-6109
B UROLOGY SURGERY
Department: SOM - Urology
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UCI Medical Center, Bldg. 55; Basement, Rm. 020

Research Description

PROJECT #1 - The significance of advancement in Minimally Invasive Surgery (laparoscopic and robotic) for Urologic applications is of the utmost importance to Dr. Landman and his team. The diversity of this department is immense, and includes: clinical investigations, advanced training for surgeons, animal investigations, environmental sustainability, biomedical engineering for new technology and philanthropy. The student will be expected to assist in study administration and implementation, data collection and data analysis. Depending on the student's contribution, he/she will have opportunities to be co-authored in abstracts/publications and possibly present at conferences worldwide. PROJECT #2 - Pre-Clinical Research Description: Students will assist in all aspects of the Surgical Education Center, comprised of urologic pre-clinical research, courses, training events and outreach. Students will be exposed to medical device development and surgical technique testing on pigs and cadavers, as it relates to the treatment of kidney, ureter, bladder, and prostate diseases. Pre-clinical research responsibilities will include but is not limited to study procedure execution / contribution, data collection / analysis, equipment and instrumentation set up, preparation of cadaver specimens and/or pigs, assisting surgeons throughout procedure, cleanup post lab, re-organizing instruments and assists with inventory of supplies. In addition to preclinical research, students will be exposed to and expected to assist in surgical training courses and outreach events held in the laboratory. Must be available for some but not all weekend labs. Must be able to lift up to 50lbs, as instrumentation/equipment can be heavy and physically demanding. Most of work time requires standing. This is an excellent opportunity for students interested in a career in medicine, specifically surgery.

Requirements to Participate

PROJECT #1 - Must be at least a 3rd year undergraduate. Must be willing to commute to the medical center. Morning availability is preferred. Please submit CV upon initial contact. PROJECT #2 - TO PARTICIPATE: As this is an intensive and highly competitive Bio199 position, there is a minimum 2 year commitment but the student must not perform lower than a B+, else the student may be discontinued from the program. COURSE COMPLETION: BIO 194S GRADE POINT AVERAGE: 3.25 TIME COMMITMENT PER WEEK: 10-12 hrs. NUMBER OF UNITS REQUIRED: 3-4

Grade Point Average

3.25

Time Commitment per Week

3+ hrs. per unit

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, quality of contributions, and peer-evaluation from other lab team members. Quality of work, teamwork, attitude and fulfillment of time completed.
Lawson, Devon
Lab Contact:
Devon Lawson
dalawson@uci.edu
310-889-4697
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Physiology and Biophysics
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140 Sprague Hall

Research Description

Our lab is interested in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic spread of cancer cells to other tissues, as this is the cause of >90% of patient mortality. We study metastasis using patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, where patient tumor specimens are transplanted into mice. We study metastasis in these models using cutting edge single-cell technologies to understand how the interplay between intracellular signals within the cancer cells, and extracellular stimuli from cells in the microenvironment influence the metastatic potential of individual cancer cells. REQUIREMENTS TO PARTICIPATE: Background in biology, fulfillment of the time commitment, maintenance of a thorough lab notebook, lab meeting attendance, and enthusiasm for science and the scientific process.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 2 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 25Pts. Lab work: 45Pts. Communication: 15Pts. Lab citizenship: 15Pts.
Lee, Eva
Lab Contact:
Eva Lee
elee@uci.edu
(949) 824-9766
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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Sprague Hall 140

Research Description

Eva Lee and her laboratory study genomic instability and cancer etiology. They investigate tissue-specific functions of breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, and interactions between tumor suppressors and endocrines. Her team demonstrated that inhibition of the stabilized progesterone receptor in BRCA1 and p53-mutated mammary epithelial cells prevented or delayed mammary tumors. They continued to focus on the mechanisms of progesterone receptor stabilization as well as the usage of anti-progesterone in breast cancer prevention and progesterone receptor positive breast cancer treatment. How mutations of BRCA genes affect mammary epithelial cell fates and mechanisms of cancer stem cells expansion during the course of chemo-resistance are being studied. The roles of microRNAs are being addressed. In addition, Eva Lee and her laboratory investigate the interaction among checkpoint kinases and DNA repair proteins in the maintenance of genomic stability. Her team demonstrated functional links between ATM and NBS1. They have identified novel mediator, Cep164, for the ATM and ATR signaling pathways that guard genomic stability. How Cep164 function in primary cilia and checkpoint related to degeneration seen in the patients are being investigated.

Requirements to Participate

Lab courses or previous lab experience COURSE COMPLETION: Biology course; Molecular biology & Genetic courses preferred

Grade Point Average

3.2

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation and effort
Leon, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Leon
A DEVEL PSYCHOBIOLOGY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Leslie, Frances
Lab Contact:
Frances Leslie
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pharmacology
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N/A
Limoli, Charles
Lab Contact:
Charles Limoli
A STEM CELLS
Department: SOM - Radiation Oncology
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N/A
LIN, HARRISON W N/A N/A
Lin, Shin
Lab Contact:
Shin Lin
A MIND/BODY/SIGNAL
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Linskey, Mark
Lab Contact:
Yi-Hong Zhou
yihongz@uci.edu
949-824-5767
A BRAIN TUMOR RESRCH
Department: Surgery
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Med Sci 1, C-214

Research Description

Active malignant glioma brain tumor molecular biology, cell culture, in vivo xenograft, and translational applications laboratory now continuously active for 7 years. Focus is on the PAX 6 tumor suppressive gene signaling pathway, downstream EFEMP1 extracellular protein translational therapeutic potential, studying intra-tumoral heterogeneity and plasticity among tumor stem-like cell and main tumor mass cell populations, the study of chromosome 7 mis-segregation as a mechanism for the former, and the study of the mechanisms of glioma radioresistance.

Grade Point Average

>/= 3.2

Time Commitment per Week

1 year Commitment

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20 pts Lab Work: 20 pts Communication: 20 pts Lab Citizenship: 20 pts Total: 100 Points
Liu, Haoping
Lab Contact:
Haoping Liu
h4liu@uci.edu
A CANDIDA ALBICANS
Department: Biological Chemistry
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D234, D212 MED SCI I
LIU-SMITH, FENG N/A N/A
Lodoen, Melissa
Lab Contact:
Melissa Lodoen
mlodoen@uci.edu
(949) 824-7805
A PARASITE IMMUNITY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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3336 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

My research examines the interaction between the immune system and the parasite pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. T. gondii infects approximately one third of the human population worldwide and causes a lifelong chronic infection. The projects in my lab focus on defining the molecular mechanisms by which T. gondii modulates host immune responses during acute infection. Specifically, we are investigating the pathways by which T. gondii alters the expression of receptors and ligands on the surface of infected immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. We are also working to determine how altered receptor expression affects the ability of infected cells to communicate with other cells in the environment. The goal of these studies is to gain insight into how T. gondii modulates mechanisms of host defense

Requirements to Participate

Highly motivated second or third year Biological Sciences students. Attendance and participation in weekly lab meetings is expected.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Demonstration of initiative, effort, research progress, and quality of written and oral (one presentation in lab meeting each quarter) presentation.
Long, Anthony
Lab Contact:
Anthony Long
A QUANTITATIVE GENET
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
Longhurst, John
Lab Contact:
Stephanie Tjen-A-Looi
stjenalo@uci.edu
(949) 824-5602
A MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Cardiology
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N/A

Research Description

Investigates the neurophysiological mechanisms involved in autonomic reflexes including cardiovascular and acupuncture related mechanisms. Also studying the role of mechanical factors and metabolic products such as bradykinin in stimulating ischemically and reperfusion-sensitive cardiac sensory nerves. These nerves are responsible for angina and a number of other reflexes that lead to hypertension in the immediate post-bypass period, arrhythmias, hypotension, nausea and vomiting

Requirements to Participate

Upper division students who have had introductory physiology/neurophysiology course. However, year 2 Bio. Majors considered. Students will be involved in whole-animal surgical procedures and histological procedures prefer students who can commit to at least 2-3 hour time blocks.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

6 hours/wk
Lotfipour, Shahrdad
Lab Contact:
Shahrdad Lotfipour, Ph.D.
shahrdad@uci.edu
A ADDICTION BIOLOGY
Department: Emergency Medicine
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UC Irvine Medical School Main Campus, Med Surge II, Room 303, Irvine, CA 92612

Research Description

Research objectives of the laboratory & Bio Sci 199 course in Addiction Biology are to understand the mechanisms mediating adolescent substance use addictive disorders. Special interest is in understanding how brain and behavior interact with environment (i.e. developmental drug exposure) to influence addiction. Focus is placed on midbrain and limbic brain regions in modulating baseline and drug-induced brain and behavior associations. The longterm goals of the research studies are to further our understanding of the impact of drugs of abuse on the developing brain and behavior. The information gathered aims to assist in the development of better prevention and intervention strategies for the reduction of adolescent addictive disorders in the future. Overall, the research program & Addiction Biology (Bio Sci 199) course aim to inspire and teach UCI undergraduate students through selective one-on-one instruction with interactive bench-to-bedside translational research studies in the discipline of developmental neuropsychopharmacology, with the integration of molecular neurobiology, pharmacology, neurochemistry, brain imaging and/or behavior. The goal is to provide a unique opportunity for students to study how simple molecules and complex environments interact to influence brain and behavior in animal models of addiction, with translational relevance to the adolescent human population. Students applying for the research program & Addiction Biology (Bio Sci 199) course should have the the following personal characteristics: be highly motivated, independent, reliable, detail-oriented, punctual, confident, mature, well-rounded, conscientious, with excellent communications skills (written and oral), and who aspire to be leaders in their chosen field of study. In particular, students interested in pursuing the fields of industry, medicine and/or science, are highly sought after. Students from diverse backgrounds from all disciplines are encouraged to apply, particularly those who wish to build hands-on laboratory and/or life skills to be effective future mentors, instructors, doctors, and scientific colleagues. Overall, the goal of the research program & Bio Sci 199 course in Addiction Biology is to develop undergraduate students who will have personal, scientific and/or community outreach skills that can successfully lead them to compete for top graduate programs and/or careers, in order to pursue a lifelong devotion to academics, research and/or medicine. Students interested in scientific publishing, grant writing, presentations, and/or learning hands-on laboratory skills in the disciplines of brain imaging, pharmacology, neurochemistry, drug addiction, adolescent neurobiology and/or behavior are all encouraged to apply. Students should be interested in investing a minimum of at least two-years into the research program as well as 15-20 hours / week into the Bio Sci 199 course in Addiction Biology. For Bio Sci majors, students should have already completed Bio Sci 94 & Bio Sci 194S. Non-Bio Sci majors are not required to take Bio Sci 94. When applying for this position, please email your expression of interest, curriculum vitae (with contact information for 1-2 references) and academic transcript to: shahrdad@uci.edu (http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=6177). When expressing your interest via email, please also include 1-3 paragraphs on: (i) Why you are specifically interested in applying for this research opportunity & Addiction Biology (Bio Sci 199) course, (ii) What you hope to attain & learn from this research opportunity & Addiction Biology (Bio Sci 199) course, and, (iii) Why you are particularly well suited for this research opportunity & Addiction Biology (Bio Sci 199) course. For work-study students, please include this information as part of your application. For high school or non-UCI students, acceptance may be granted into the laboratory based on an individual bases and requirements set forth by the Student Research Intern Program (SRIP). Please send your expression of interest to the above email.

Grade Point Average

3.3 and above

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units. Minimum 4 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be evaluated based on attendance, lab citizenship, communication and their laboratory work. In particular, students will be in encouraged and evaluated on their participation in giving oral presentations as well as: reading/writing research papers, protocols, summary statements, scientific proposals, applying for Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program grants, and/or actively participating in research meetings and/or the laboratory.
Lotfipour, Shahram
Lab Contact:
Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont
whoonpon@uci.edu
(714) 456-5239
B EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Emergency Medicine
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Emergency Department at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange, CA.

Research Description

The Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program (EMRAP) is a clinical research program at the UCI Medical Center in Orange, CA. Founded by Dr. Federico Vaca in 1997, EMRAP provides undergraduates with a unique opportunity to contribute directly to research projects in the Emergency Department and Level 1 Trauma Center through first-hand experience with patient interaction and close faculty mentorship from the UCI School of Medicine. During each four-hour shift, students interface with patients, families, and physicians to obtain consent and collect data for multiple studies, with tasks ranging from performing ultrasound imaging on patients to providing a computerized alcohol screening and brief intervention to trauma victims. Research associates also gain knowledge in the methodology of clinical and epidemiological research through a parallel Academic Program, led by EMRAP Director Dr. Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont. While participating in EMRAP, students can pursue leadership opportunities by serving as ?liaisons? for chosen projects and thereby play a key role in the implementation and integrity of research protocol for that study. All EMRAP associates are encouraged to take full advantage of UCI's extensive undergraduate research opportunities, from applying to grant funding from the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program to presenting their results through the School of Biological Sciences Excellence in Research program. In addition to being an integral part of the workings of the Department of Emergency Medicine, EMRAP strives to prepare students as future leaders and healthcare professionals and to foster greater understanding of clinical emergency medicine and our community's public health needs.

Requirements to Participate

Current UCI undergraduate or post-baccalaureate student, standard Bio 199 prerequisites, minimum one-year commitment (including summer and breaks between academic terms). interest in clinical or epidemiological research, UCI parking permit.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Tuesday research meeting at medical education bldg. UCI campus.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, participation, professionalism, and fulfillment of liaison duties, if applicable.
Lott, Ira
Lab Contact:
Eric Doran
edoran@uci.edu
(714) 456-8443
B PEDIATRIC & NEUROL
Department: SOM - Pediatrics
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City Tower, Suite 800

Research Description

Development, Aging and Dementia in Down Syndrome: The objective of this project is to understand the relationship between Alzheimer disease, dementia and Down syndrome. The research is supported by the NIH. Students will have the opportunity to participate in clinical research trials and will have the opportunity for direct patient contact. Students will also assist in database management and will be trained to administer several neuropsychological tests. Students with a major in the biological sciences and a strong interest in clinical research are preferred. There is potential for independent research projects and publication.

Requirements to Participate

Must be reliable, self-motivated and enthusiastic

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Variable

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work performed and participation
Loudon, Catherine
Lab Contact:
Catherine Loudon
cloudon@uci.edu
(949) 824-0371
A BIOMECHANICS
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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5215 McGaugh Hall.

Research Description

Biomechanics, physiology, and sensory ecology of insects. Undergraduate researchers have worked on a variety of projects including investigating the mechanical properties of insect antennae and mechanics of locomotion in insects.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work.
Luderer, Ulrike
Lab Contact:
Ulrike Luderer
uluderer@uci.edu
(949) 824-3389
A MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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Office location: 100 Theory Drive, Suite 100. Lab location: Med Surge 2

Research Description

Research in my laboratory centers on the mechanisms by which chemical toxicants damage the ovary, potentially causing infertility and ovarian cancer, and in understanding differences in ovarian susceptibility to toxicants. We are particularly interested in oxidative stress as a mechanism of ovarian injury and in the modulation of susceptibility to ovarian injury by biotransformation enzymes and antioxidants. Work in my laboratory has demonstrated roles for oxidative stress in spontaneous and toxicant-induced apoptosis in granulosa cells of ovarian follicles. Many known ovarian toxicants are conjugated by the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), and GSH is also a critical detoxification mechanism for reactive oxygen species. Using cultured ovarian follicles and granulosa cells, we showed that increased generation of reactive oxygen species is an early event in the induction of apoptosis by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, by the anticancer drug cyclophosphamide, and by ionizing radiation, that depletion of GSH sensitizes to these agents, and that GSH supplementation is protective. Recently, we showed that female mice genetically deficient in GSH synthesis have poor oocyte quality, with small litters due to preimplantation embryonic mortality. Moreover, females deficient in GSH synthesis have increased sensitivity to premature ovarian failure and ovarian tumors caused by prenatal exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene. Ongoing studies are using genetically modified mouse models with specific deficits in GSH synthesis to understand the roles these play in ovarian susceptibility to toxicant-induced ovarian damage, ovarian aging, and ovarian cancer.

Requirements to Participate

Motivation, enthusiasm. Sophomore or Junior, 3.3 GPA, minimum commitment of 2 academic years, 12-16 hours per week minimum, willing to work some weekends, willing to work with mice, attend weekly lab meetings and present research in lab meetings.

Grade Point Average

3.3 or better

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hours; Required 3 to 4 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Presentations in lab meetings, understanding of topic, reliability, effort put into work.
Luecke, Harmut
Lab Contact:
Harmut Luecke
hudel@uci.edu
(949) 824-1605/1797
A PROTEIN CRYSTAL
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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SH520/530/540.

Research Description

The main focus of my laboratory are structure-function investigations of integral membrane proteins. To date the atomic structures of less than 250 membrane proteins are known (vs. over 70,000 for soluble proteins). This is in stark contrast to the fact the most genomes contain 20-30% membrane proteins. Recently, we have solved the atomic resolution structure of the light-driven ion pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in the resting state at atomic resolution. Together with the structures of several photocycle intermediates 'frozen in mid-stroke' we have been able to develop a detailed atomic mechanism of light-driven ion pumping. In addition, the structures of a related membrane protein that serves as the primary receptor in archaeal phototaxis (sensory rhodopsin) and that of a photoreceptor from Anabaena, the first eubacterial rhodopsin structure, have been determined. Another area of interest is structure-based drug discovery. A) We are studying annexins, a family of proteins that interact with phospholipid bilayers in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Annexins are involved in cancer and have been reported to mediate membrane aggregation and fusion, as well as ion channel formation. Detailed structural studies of annexins are essential for understanding their fusogenic and ion channel forming properties at the atomic level. B) We have recently solved the structure of a key enzyme in purine metabolism, inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of IMP to XMP which in turn is converted to GMP, an essential building block of DNA. The IMPDH-reaction is the rate-limiting step in GMP synthesis and is thus a promising target for anti-parasitic and anti-bacterial drugs. We are currently focusing on IMPDHs from P. falciparum, M. tuberculosis , and T. foetus. C) p53, the well-known tumor suppressor, is another target. Due to the techniques we use we require a long-term commitment (ideally two years). Most projects will include setting up crystallization trials - often resulting in a paper if diffracting crystals are obtained.

Requirements to Participate

Participation in Honors / Research Excellence program strongly advised, writing of UROP/SURP proposals required COURSE COMPLETION: 97, 98, 99 with A- or better

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12-15 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Presentation and UROP/SURP proposals/poster.
Luo, Ray
Lab Contact:
Ray Luo
rluo@uci.edu
(949) 824-9528
A COMPUTATIONAL BIO
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A

Research Description

We rely on computational approaches to study structures and functions of biomolecules. Our final goal is to interpret the structural and functional information encoded in genomes and to understand life at the most fundamental level based on physical and chemical principles. Our current research focuses on developing reliable and efficient methods to study biomolecular structures, functions, and intermolecular interactions at atomic detail, and applying our new methods to understand and predict the relations between the sequences, structures and functions of these molecules. Students may choose to focus on the following two general areas of research in the lab. Protein Folding Mechanism and Structure Prediction The ability of proteins to perform various biological functions is attributed to their unique three-dimensional structures which are predetermined by their amino acid sequences. The amazing feat that these molecules have to accomplish to assemble themselves quickly and reliably has puzzled scientists in many different fields for decades. The so-called protein folding problem involves the fundamental issue to understand the folding mechanism and the challenging final goal to predict three-dimensional structures from amino acid sequences. It is often regarded as the second half of genomics. Protein-Protein and Protein-Ligand Interactions Structure determination is only the first half of biochemistry. Function annotation is the other more important half. This requires that we study how biomolecules interact with each other and how such interactions assist functioning. The knowledge is often helpful, sometimes critical, in developing new medicines. Computational studies on intermolecular interactions can provide many insights to the understanding. Computational findings are also much easier to be converted into new virtual compounds which may eventually lead to new drugs

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Bio99.

Time Commitment per Week

10

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort, i.e. research time in the lab, is evaluated for grade in the first quarter. Quarterly presentations will be evaluated for grades in the later quarters.
Luo, David
Lab Contact:
David Luo
zluo@uci.edu
(714) 456-7962
A PAIN MECHANISMS
Department: SOM - Anesthes & Perioperative Care
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N/A

Research Description

Gene Regulation & intracellular signaling pathways contributing to pain transduction. Use of animal models mimicking human pain inducting conditions, such as nerve injury and bone cancer, to identify potential target genes and pathways, and study their regulation in sensory neurons and spinal cord and their relationship to pain development under these pathological conditions. Small animal surgery, behavioral pharmacology, cellular and molecular biology techniques, including fluorescent microscopy, gene chip experiments, and transgenic/knock out mice, are utilized in studies. Currently characterizing several genes and signaling pathways that may play important roles in neuropathic pain (pain derived from nerve injury) and cancer pain processing

Requirements to Participate

Completion of basic courses of biology, cellular and molecular biology or animal physiology or computer science and three letters of recommendation. Selection: academic achievements, experience, enthusiasm, self-motivation.

Grade Point Average

3
Luptak, Andrej
Lab Contact:
Andrej Luptak
aluptak@uci.edu
A RNA MOLECULAR BIO
Department: SOM - Pharmaceutical Sciences
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2141 Natural Sciences II
Lynch, Gary
Lab Contact:
Linda Palmer
lcpalmer@uci.edu
(949) 689-7099
A NEUR ACTVTY/AROUSAL
Department: SOM - Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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GNRF 1216 Bench 13

Research Description

The main goal of our research is to discover the mechanisms behind learning and memory. Our lab focuses on rat behavior. Various learning paradigms are used to examine different types of learning and how they manifest in the hippocampus, the theorized site of memory formation. The rat brain is dissected and processed for microscopic imaging and analysis, and this information is used to help further our understanding of the complex pathways that lead to memory formation

Requirements to Participate

Completion of the Bio194S Lab Safety course is required. Students should be comfortable handling animals (training is provided). We are looking for open-minded students who are willing to learn and contribute their own ideas on how to improve on procedures and projects.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

At least 10 hours per week, either mornings and/or afternoons on a consistent schedule in order to handle animals and help run behavioral experiments.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be given based on the quality of work and time and effort committed to the projects.
Lyon, David
Lab Contact:
David Lyon
A NEURAL CIRCUITS
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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N/A
Macgregor, Grant
Lab Contact:
Grant Macgregor
A MOUSE GAMETOGENESIS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Mahler, Stephen
Lab Contact:
Stephen Mahler
mahlers@uci.edu
949-824-6128
A ADDICTION CIRCUITS
Department: Neurobiology and Behavior
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McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Research Program: We seek to understand the brain circuits underlying motivated behavior, and how these change in addiction and other psychiatric disorders. Background: Brain circuits of “reward” are evolutionarily ancient, and likely function in a qualitatively similar way in humans and model organisms such as rodents. Such homology should not be surprising considering the strong adaptive pressure on organisms to efficiently exploit environmental opportunities when they are available. In order to attain a natural reward like food, water, or sex, animals must know what and where rewards are, and how to get them. This is accomplished in part via the brain’s “reward circuitry,” aspects of which allow animals to recognize rewards when they are attained, learn about the circumstances in which they were attained, remember these circumstances when they are encountered in future, and generate appropriate motivated behavior at those times. We investigate the neural circuits underlying these psychological processes, including learning, motivation, and pleasure. We employ anatomical, pharmacological, and virus-based strategies to examine and control neuronal populations and circuits in rodents, with the aim of understanding how these circuits control behavior. Applicants must meet the following criteria: –Willing to work with rodents –Ability to commit to 10 hours/week for at least two consecutive academic quarters –Consistent availability across days preferred (early evenings OK) –Available and willing to work weekends If you are a highly motivated current UCI undergrad, preferably with at least some laboratory experience or neuroscience coursework background, please see http://faculty.sites.uci.edu/mahlerlab/ for more information.

Requirements to Participate

1 year Commitment

Grade Point Average

3.4

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit; Minimum 3 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 25pts. Lab Work: 40pts. Communication: 15pts. Lab Citizenship: 20pts.
Malik, Shaista
Lab Contact:
Shaista Malik
smalik@uci.edu
(714) 456-3868
B CARDIOLOGY
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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UCI medical center

Research Description

The focus of our research is the role of cardiovascular imaging, such as cardiac CT, in preventive cardiology. We have a current clinical trial in examining the effects of cardiac CT in identifying early coronary artery disease in patients with diabetes. We are also involved in retrospective data analysis on relationship between cardiac plaque on CT and patient risk factors.

Requirements to Participate

Have completed UCI IRB tutorials on human research and HIPAA

Time Commitment per Week

3-4 hours a week for each unit of course credit.
Marsh, Lawrence
Lab Contact:
Lawrence Marsh
A MOLECULAR GENETICS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Marshall, Andrew N/A N/A
Marshall, John
Lab Contact:
John Marshall
jfmarsha@uci.edu
(949) 824-6636
A NEUROMECHANISMS
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

Research in Dr. Marshall's lab is directed at (1) the neurobiological bases of chronic drug abuse (cocaine, amphetamine), and (2) factors that facilitate outcome after brain injury relevant to Parkinson's disease. Both projects use animal models to study brain events contributing to human disease. Undergraduates participate in many ways, including handling and training animals, sectioning and staining tissue, analyzing tissue, and assisting in neurosurgical procedures. Students participating for more than 2 quarters are encouraged to develop projects in which they take more of a lead role

Requirements to Participate

Coursework (Bio Sci 110), GPA, motivation to do research, communication skills. Readings will be assigned to supplement laboratory work.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

15 hrs/wk
Martiny, Adam
Lab Contact:
Adam Martiny
amartiny@uci.edu
(949) 824-9713
A MARINE CYANOBACTERI
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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3208 Croul Hall

Research Description

My lab works at the interface between microbiology, ocean ecosystem ecology, and global change. In particular, we are interested in understanding the present and future global distribution of marine cyanobacteria and how they will respond to ocean warming. This includes how cyanobacteria will evolve and adapt to new environments. Student projects could include lab work using culturing and molecular techniques (e.g. PCR), DNA sequence analysis, and modeling.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be prepared to work with other group member as well as develop independent projects, Students will be expected to participate in lab activities and meetings.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be based on time committed to the project and the quality of research.
Martiny, Jennifer
Lab Contact:
Jennifer Martiny
jmartiny@uci.edu
(949) 824-0487
A MICROBIAL DIVERSITY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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Steinhaus 455

Research Description

Our lab investigates the mechanisms underlying microbial diversity patterns and how this diversity affects ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling. We use culturing and molecular genetics tools to quantify the diversity of microorganisms including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses in a variety of systems such as grasslands and the coastal ocean. Undergraduate projects mostly involve laboratory work, but opportunities exist for fieldwork and computer modeling.

Requirements to Participate

Bio 194S Saftey & Ethics COURSE COMPLETION: none

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Proposal, weekly meetings, time commitment and quality of research, research report
Massimelli, Maria Julia
Lab Contact:
Julia Massimelli
julia.massimelli@uci.edu
9498247998
A BACTERIAL PROMOTERS
Department: Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
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2232 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

My research involves the study of promoters regulating the expression of bacterial virulence factor genes. The project uses synthetic biology and molecular biology techniques. We are currently characterizing a promoter regulating the expression of a choline transporter in E. coli.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 2 units

Grade Point Average

none

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work 40Pts (quality, accuracy, safety) Communication 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, meetings with mentor) Lab citizenship 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through) Lab notebook 20 pt (proper data recording) Total 120 points
Mauzy-Melitz, Debra
Lab Contact:
Debra Mauzy-Melitz
dmauzyme@uci.edu
(949) 824-2475
A DEV & CELL EDUC
Department: Developmental and Cell Biology
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4228 McGaugh Hall
Mcclelland, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Mcclelland
mmcclell@uci.edu
(858) 336-9554
A CANCER BACTERIA
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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Medical Surge I.

Research Description

“The role of the stroma prostate cancer progression” Research Description We are studying the role of the normal tissue surrounding prostate cancer. This stroma may be important in supporting the tumor, and may contribute the chance of the tumor becoming metastatic. There appears to be differences in the stroma that distinguish most African Americans for European Americans, so we are studying gene expression and DNA methylation to identify genes that might be prognostic in each race, and those genes that might be most useful in all races. Each student will engage in research adapted to fit their background and/or interest either by bench work or by using computational analysis, or both. Projects will subsequently expand to fit the growing capabilities of the student in any of a variety of areas including, but not limited to, PCR, RNA-seq, DNA polymorphisms, population biology, mutant constructions, writing of algorithms for data analysis. Students that dedicate at least a year to their research project may have done enough work to obtain authorship on a published peer-reviewed scientific paper. ****************************************** “Evolution and systems biology of bacteria”. We use comparative genome sequencing and through high-throughput screening of bacterial mutants. We are also studying the behavior of bacteria as delivery agents for cancer therapeutics. Of particular interest to us is the life cycle of the pathogen Salmonella as a model of bacterial infectious disease, including various environmental, ecological, and food safety niches. Each student will engage in research adapted to fit their background and/or interest either by growing bacterial mutants in a variety of novel growth conditions, or by using computational analysis, or both. Projects will subsequently expand to fit the growing capabilities of the student in any of a variety of areas including, but not limited to, PCR, RNA-seq, DNA polymorphisms, population biology, mutant constructions, writing of algorithms for data analysis. Students that dedicate at least a year to their research project may have done enough work to obtain authorship on a published peer-reviewed scientific paper. *

Requirements to Participate

Second or third year students only. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 194S Safety and Ethics Research Course and be in good academic standing OTHER: All laboratory work requires some capability in mathematics. Must have obtained at least one ?A? grade in a University level Mathematics, Statistics, or Computer Science Course. Each quarter students will turn in a 2 page summary of work completed. This can include background information obtained by reading the literature, details about a technique learned, and/or data generated.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Safety, effort, etiquette, and clear, complete, and accurate records of all results, including errors. Later quarters assess common sense, independence, initiative, and critical thinking. You can get an A by being outstanding in any one area of laboratory research or by being excellent in most areas.
McGaugh, James
Lab Contact:
Nan Collett
nkcollet@uci.edu
A LEARNING & MEMORY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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307 Qureshey Research Laboratory

Research Description

This research program investigates the nature and bases of superior memory. In recent years our research has identified human subjects who have highly superior autobiographical memory and have investigated how this memory ability differs from normal memory. Participation in this research will require reading of published papers and chapters reporting and discussing investigations of superior memory as well as writing of a review paper.

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Reading and researching papers: 40 pts Discussion with professor: 25 pts Writing paper: 35 pts.
Mchenry, Matthew
Lab Contact:
Matthew Mchenry
A BIOMECHANICS
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
McNaughton, Bruce
Lab Contact:
Geoffrey Shafer
geoff.o.shafer@uci.edu
(949) 824-8830
A Systems neurosci
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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105 Qureshey

Research Description

The main focus of my research is the physiological and computational basis of cognition, with particular focus on memory and memory disorders, and the dynamic interactions among neuronal populations and synaptic plasticity mechanisms that underlie these phenomena. I have made significant contributions to the understanding of central synaptic plasticity mechanisms, spatial information processing in the hippocampal formation and cortex, cortico-hippocampal interactions and memory consolidation, and the aging of the nervous system. My current activities use high density neural recording and cellular level activity imaging (in animals) to focus on understanding the neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation ('head-direction', 'place', and 'grid' cells in the hippocampal formation and associated networks), the reactivation of memory traces in the cortex during sleep following learning and the role of this process in memory consolidation, and the self organization of synaptic networks during the acquisition of ‘semantic knowledge’ in the brain. Throughout my career I have been involved in the development and application of new conceptual approaches and innovative technologies to these research questions.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be in at least their 3rd year of a biological sciences program and have had some introduction to fundamental neurobiology.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

5 hours

What does it take to complete this course?

Learning basic computer skills (e.g., Matlab) for data analysis, learning basics of animal handling, surgery and behavioral training, learning about modern methods for monitoring neural activity.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Instructor's appraisal of the student's development of laboratory skills in the mutually agreed upon research project.
Mcpherson, Alexander
Lab Contact:
Alexander Mcpherson
A MACROMOL STRUCTURE
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Mehta, Mitul
Lab Contact:
Darren Knight
darrenk@uci.edu
714-506-5512
A OCT BIG DATA
Department: Ophthalmology
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Gavin Herbert Eye Institute

Research Description

A Large Retrospective Study of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Retina in Cataract and Refractive Surgery Patients In this project we are doing a large dataset analysis using human subject medical records and imaging data in ophthalmology and correlating it to refractive surgery outcomes.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit

Grade Point Average

2.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Lab Work: 60Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety) Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through). Total: 100 points.
Mercola, Dan
Lab Contact:
Dan Mercola
A ARRACH SALMONELLA
Department: SOM - Pathology
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N/A
Mesinkovska, Natasha
Lab Contact:
Patricia Summerville
dermresearch@uci.edu
949-824-7103
B DERMATOLOGY RSRCH
Department: Dermatology
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Hewitt Hall Dermatology Research Center

Research Description

The dermatology clinical research center is located in Hewitt Hall and has a tradition of conducting clinical trials in skin and hair, including psoriasis, eczema, alopecia and skin cancers among others. We study novel medications and devices, such as lasers. Students will get a chance to learn how to analyze skin diseases, collect data, work on registries and have close patient contact. Students will understand the experimental studies needed prior to approving a medication for market. This is a perfect opportunity for anyone contemplating health sciences as a career choice. The student is expected to work as a part of a team and contribute in all aspects of research from communicating and assisting physicians, patients, collecting data and data entry. The student will work closely with the research coordinators. The students will also get a close mentorship from the Principal investigator. Enrolled students will have the opportunity to determine the direction of their own project and work towards completing a presentation at a national research meeting and/or a publication.

Requirements to Participate

1-2 year commitment.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20. Research work: 50. Communication: 30.
Messaoudi, Ilhem
Lab Contact:
Ilhem Messaoudi
Imessaou@uci.edu
909-494-6236
A HOST DEFENSE
Department: Molecular biology and biochemistry
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Biological sciences III

Research Description

Students will study mechanisms by which the host responds to microbial infection from infants to aged individuals using a variety of cellular and molecular methodologies.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 3 units.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time). Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety). Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through). Total: 100 points
Metherate, Raju
Lab Contact:
Raju Metherate
rmethera@uci.edu
(949) 824-6141
A SYN PHYSIOL NEOCORT
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

Neurophysiology of auditory cortex

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Varies
Meyskens, Frank
Lab Contact:
Frank Meyskens
flmeyske@uci.edu
(949) 824-9267
A MELANOCYTES/MELANOM
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A

Research Description

My laboratory investigates the biology of human melanoma and the factors that contribute to its etiology and progression Current work is focused on redox-responsive transcription factors and the contribution of heavy metals

Requirements to Participate

Experince with cell culture desireable

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs/wk
Miledi, Ricardo
Lab Contact:
Ricardo Miledi
A CELL MOLEC NEUROBIO
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Molloi, Sabee
Lab Contact:
Sabee Molloi
symolloi@uci.edu
949-824-5904
A Medical imaging
Department: Radiological Sciences
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Medical Sciences, B-126

Research Description

Description: An exciting research opportunity is available in a medical imaging laboratory that focuses on cardiovascular and breast imaging. Research topics include studying coronary artery disease and developing new imaging techniques. Learning opportunities include the following: • Participation in swine surgical procedures • X-ray imaging and data acquisition • Coronary flow analysis • 3-D reconstruction of coronary arteries • Monte Carlo simulations • Development of new medical imaging devices

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time). Lab Work: 50Pts (quality, accuracy). Communication: 10Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through). Total: 100 points.
Monuki, Edwin
Lab Contact:
Edwin Monuki
emonuki@uci.edu
(949) 824-9604
A NEUROPATHOLOGY
Department: SOM - Pathology
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Gross Hall, Room 2200

Research Description

Our laboratory studies how the forebrain and its stem cells develop, and applies this information to human disorders and cell-based applications. Current efforts focus on applications using stem cell-derived choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs), the forebrain cells that produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and have untapped therapeutic potential. Other work involves the assessment of choroid plexus pathology in Alzheimer disease, and pre-clinical studies following experimental cell transplantation in mouse models of neurologic diseases. Experimental tools include mouse genetics, cell transplantations, organotypic explants, and mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cell cultures.

Requirements to Participate

Top 25% academically, with drive, motivation, enthusiasm, interest, and intellect. Team player who desires independent project. Attends and presents at lab meetings, and engages with the lab and stem cell community. Biology and/or chemistry wet lab experience required; previous experimental lab experience preferred.

Time Commitment per Week

10+ hrs/wk during the school year for 1½-2 years (no seniors, please).
Mooney, Kailen
Lab Contact:
Kailen Mooney
mooneyk@uci.edu
(949) 824-7852
A COMMUNITY ECOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A

Research Description

We use field and laboratory studies to investigate the interactions among insects, how insects affect plants, and how plants affect insects. Our research employs a variety of techniques, including growing of plants and maintenance of insect colonies in the lab and greenhouse, measurement of plant chemical and morphological traits, and sampling and quantification of insect communities in the field. We are primarily interested in students willing to make a one-year commitment. Students who make long-term commitments may have opportunities to conduct summer fieldwork at remote field sites, co-authors a scientific research paper, and conduct an honors thesis

Requirements to Participate

While some students may work entirely within the Mooney Lab, those having the means to travel independently to local field sites (within 1.5 miles) will also have the option of assisting in field research.

Time Commitment per Week

6-12 in blocks of at least 2

What does it take to complete this course?

The Mooney Lab is looking for 199 students to work on lab and field studies of the interactions among plants, insects and birds. Students should be interested in field ecology and comfortable working outdoors.
Morrissette, Naomi
Lab Contact:
Naomi Morrissette
A ORYZALIN RES MUT
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Mortazavi, Ali
Lab Contact:
Ali Mortazavi
ali.mortazavi@uci.edu
(949) 824-6762
A GENOME BIOLOGY
Department: DEVELOPMENTAL and CELL BIOLOGY
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2300 Biological Sciences 3

Research Description

The Mortazavi lab studies the function and organization of animal genomes during development and how transcriptional regulation is encoded in the genome. Student will participate in laboratory and or computational research in functional genomics using sequencing techniques such as ChIP-seq, RNA-seq and ATAC-seq in mammalian, cnidarian, and nematode genomes.

Requirements to Participate

Science Major. Strong interest in genomics. Course completion: Bio 97, Bio 98, and Bio99 or equivalent.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

Summer: 20 hours per week. Fall: 10-15 hours per week. 3-4 units required.

What does it take to complete this course?

Attend weekly group meetings

Faculty Means of Evaluation

- quarterly progress report - quarterly group meeting presentation
Mozaffar, Tahseen
Lab Contact:
Tahseen Mozaffar
mozaffar@uci.edu
(714) 456-2332
B GRAVES & MYASTHENIA
Department: SOM - Neurology
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UC Irvine-ALS Neuromuscular Center, 200 S. Manchester Avenue, Ste. 110, Orange CA 92868.

Research Description

Influence of serological status on disease variability in sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis: Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the commonest acquired muscle disorder above the age of 40 years. It is generally considered refractory to treatment and most patients have a slowly progressive course with incremental increase in physical disability. Bulbar dysfunction is not uncommon. Muscle biopsy from patients with sporadic IBM shows marked muscle fiber atrophy, T-cell mediated cytotoxic inflammatory infiltrate and rimmed vacuoles on light microscopy (and tubofilamentous inclusions on electron microscopy). The rimmed vacuoles stain positive for a myriad array of proteins including beta-amyloid, tau, SIMI32, emerin and TDP43. This has led to the theory that IBM, like Alzheimer's disease, may be a programmed degeneration of the muscle. However, there is clear evidence of autoimmunity in IBM, including upregulation of MHC-class I antigen on muscle membrane, infiltration with cytotoxic T cells and recent description of autoantibodies directed to NT5C1A, an RNA processing protein. We have started to assay our patient population for the NT5C1A antibodies and preliminary data suggests that there may be differences between patients who are seropositive and those who are seronegative, including a younger age of onset, more treatment responsive and less bulbar symptoms in seropositive patients. We now plan to prospectively study our cohort of IBM patients, including new patients, and characterize differences in disease phenotype, disease progression trends, myopathological abnormalities, bulbar dysfunction and treatment responses in IBM patients based on their serologic status. We also intend to collaborate with other national neuromuscular groups (University of Kansas and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center) on this study.

Requirements to Participate

Core courses in Biology or Neurosciences. Completion of UC Irvine IRB tutorials on human research and HIPAA

Grade Point Average

3.4

Time Commitment per Week

15 to 20hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Letter grade; mid unit evaluations will be given.
Mueller, Laurence
Lab Contact:
Laurence Mueller
A EVOLUTIONARY ECOL
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A
Mukherjee, Jorgesh
Lab Contact:
Jorgesh Mukherjee
mukherjj@uci.edu
(949) 824-2018
A IMAGE AGT
Department: SOM - Radiological Sciences
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N/A

Research Description

Design, synthesis, and use of novel imaging agents. Targets include various enzymes, receptors and neurotransmitter receptor systems, such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, glutamate and others. Applications of imaging agents include use in diagnosis of various pathophysiological conditions, evaluate effects of therapeutic drugs, effects of substance abuse drugs, study in vivo biochemistry for eventual use in human studies.
Mulligan, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Mulligan
A PLANT MOLEC BIO
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Nelson, John
Lab Contact:
Wenbin Tan
wenbintaine@gmail.com
310-819-0243
A SURGERY
Department: SOM - Surgery
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Beckman Laser Institute

Research Description

Our research will focus on Port wine stain (PWS), a congenital progressive vascular malformation of skin and occurs in an estimated prevalence of 3-5 children per 1,000 live births. We will investigate the molecular pathogenesis of PWS by using various cell and animal models. In addition, we will develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PWS.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units. Bio194S needs to be completed.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, and safety) Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with group members) Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through)
NGUYEN, TAN QUOC VIET N/A N/A
Nguyen, Ninh
Lab Contact:
Kathrina Munoz
katmunoz@uci.edu
(714) 456-8598
B SURGERY
Department: SOM - Surgery
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333 City Boulevard West, Suite 850, Orange, CA 92868

Research Description

Ninh T. Nguyen MD FACS- Minimally Invasive and Gastrointestinal Surgery RESEARCH DESCRIPTION: The Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery involves examination of various conditions and treatments affecting diseases of the esophagus, stomach and small intestine along with metabolic/bariatric surgery. Students will be expected to attend weekly clinics on Mondays and Tuesdays, as well as work independently in the office. Students are invited to observe surgery as time permits. Student tasks will include maintaining the research database, statistical analysis, and other research duties as necessary. Ability to learn new applications. Experience with Excel, Access, SPSS, Adobe Premiere, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Video editing preferred. Must be willing to travel to medical center. Student will be supervised by the PI and the surgical research resident. Contact either Kathrina Munoz at katmunoz@uci.edu OR Julie Rockwell at jmrockwe@uci.edu

Requirements to Participate

sophomore standing, Statistics and physiology recommended but not required.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work, fulfillment of time commitment
NORDEN-KRICHMAR, TRINA M N/A N/A
O'dowd, Diane
Lab Contact:
Diane O'dowd
dkodowd@uci.edu
(949) 824-4562
A DEVEL NEUROPHYSIOL
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Since the past 25 years our lab at UCI has studied the activity of living neurons from the brains of both flies and mice. We are currently exploring the role of human sodium channel mutations that cause epilepsy on channel function and neuronal activity using knock-in transgenic flies, mice and parallel studies in neurons derived from induced human pluripotent stem cells generated from fibroblasts obtained from affected individuals with these mutations. We have been analyzing CRISPR generated mice carrying human epilepsy causing mutation and are interested in understanding how channel dysfunction results in epileptic seizures. We are interested in students who want to work with mice models of genetic epilepsy.

Requirements to Participate

12 hrs/week. 1 year Commitment. Preference will be given to those with strong interest in neuroscience research and desire for a multi-quarter commitment. Students will complete all lab safety and ULAR approved animal use and care training and attend lab meetings. Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, initiative and enthusiasm, maintenance of a complete lab notebook is essential. In the final week of the quarter, students will give a 15 minute presentation on their work during lab meeting.
Osborn, Megan
Lab Contact:
Megan Osborn
mbo@uci.edu
B EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Department: SOM - Emergency Medicine
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UCI Medical Center, 200 Building, Suite 710

Research Description

Ureteral colic is a common diagnosis in the emergency department. The diagnosis of renal colic can be made via urinalysis, ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Urinalysis has an 85% sensitivity for detecting hematuria in patients with renal colic. We seek to characterize ureteral stones in patients without hematuria to determine the percentage of stones that are obstructing and/or clinically significant (causing hydronephrosis).

Requirements to Participate

Health occupations portfolio enhancement (HOPE) students only. Successful participation in data collection and manuscript preparation.

Time Commitment per Week

4 to 8 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Participation in data collection and manuscript preparation.
Ostlund, Sean
Lab Contact:
Sean Ostlund
sostlund@uci.edu
949-824-1347
A Behavioral Neurosci
Department: Anesthesiology & Perioperative Care
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Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility

Research Description

We study the mechanisms underlying motivated behavior, including pathological forms of motivated behavior associated with compulsive drug use and overeating. We are also interested in how pain and stress impact motivated learning and behavior. Our research involves the use of rodent subjects that have been trained to perform sophisticated reward-motivated tasks. We apply a variety of cutting edge techniques to study the neurobiological processes that support motivated behavior, including fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and optogenetics.

Requirements to Participate

Must have completed Bio 35, Bio 36 or related courses. Please describe relevant coursework in application. Successful candidates should be highly motivated and interested in committing to at least 3 quarters of research.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

12-16 hours per week.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students will be evaluated based on their overall attitude and performance, including their tendency to follow safe/responsible research practices. Enthusiastic and reliable students are sure to do well (and have fun!) in the lab. Students will submit a short summary of their research experience at the end of each quarter. Students finishing a second quarter of research will be given the opportunity to orally present their findings to the lab, a valuable training exercise for aspiring scientists.
Parekh, Nimisha
Lab Contact:
Sentelle Eubanks
sentelle@uci.edu
714-456-2215
B GI RESEARCH
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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UCIMC

Research Description

Students will work with Clinical Research Patients presenting to the Comprehensive Digestive Disease Center. Students will be able to observe interventional procedures and research and development activities. The experience will encompass clinical research including; project design, background literature search, proposals, enrolling patients in ongoing studies, data compilation or writing/presenting research. The experience will be enhanced by being assigned to faculty and staff as liaisons for each project. We are looking for a 2 year commitment to project(s). Opportunities for publication and possibly presentation at local and national conferences are available.

Requirements to Participate

sophomore standing

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

Four hours/unit/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Ability to work independently as well as in a group setting Students will be graded on: -Work performance -Initiative -Quarterly research summary
Park, Hannah
Lab Contact:
Hannah Park
hlpark@uci.edu
(949) 824-2651
A BREAST CANCER RES
Department: SOM - Epidemiology
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Depends on location of Faculty Mentor (Sprague Hall, Irvine Hall, UCI Medical Center in Orange, or combination of these).

Research Description

Dr. Park is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine. She is the Site Program Director of the Athena Breast Health Network, a UC-wide collaboration to improve clinical care and research for breast health. The UCI Principal Investigator is Dr. Hoda Anton-Culver, Professor and Chair of Epidemiology, and the UCI Athena Team is comprised of a multi-disciplinary group of physicians and scientists, all with the common goal of making a positive impact on breast health. An array of opportunities exist for 199 students to work on a project on breast cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, or survivorship under the direct supervision of a clinical or basic science professor. Multiple positions are available now that require direct interactions with patients and clinic staff.

Requirements to Participate

Interest in breast health. Reliability. Attention to detail. Good oral and written communications skills. Regular meetings with supervisor. Periodic written and oral reports. Verbal Spanish fluency a plus. OTHER: Please send a cover letter, CV, and copy of unofficial transcript to be considered. On the last day of instruction of each quarter, students are required to turn in a 1-2 page summary of work completed. This can include background information obtained by reading the literature, details about a technique learned, and/or data generated.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

12

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work, responsibility, data collection, following appropriate lab and university-mandated safety protocols, initiative, and overall enthusiasm for research
Park, Hannah
Lab Contact:
Hannah Park
hlpark@uci.edu
(949) 824-2651
B BREAST CANCER CLNCL
Department: SOM - Epidemiology
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Depends on location of Faculty Mentor (Sprague Hall, Irvine Hall, UCI Medical Center in Orange, or combination of these).

Research Description

Dr. Park is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine. She is the Site Program Director of the Athena Breast Health Network, a UC-wide collaboration to improve clinical care and research for breast health. The UCI Principal Investigator is Dr. Hoda Anton-Culver, Professor and Chair of Epidemiology, and the UCI Athena Team is comprised of a multi-disciplinary group of physicians and scientists, all with the common goal of making a positive impact on breast health. An array of opportunities exist for 199 students to work on a project on breast cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, or survivorship under the direct supervision of a clinical or basic science professor. Multiple positions are available now that require direct interactions with patients and clinic staff.

Requirements to Participate

Interest in breast health. Reliability. Attention to detail. Good oral and written communications skills. Regular meetings with supervisor. Periodic written and oral reports. Verbal Spanish fluency a plus. Please send a cover letter, CV, and copy of unofficial transcript to be considered. On the last day of instruction of each quarter, students are required to turn in a 1-2 page summary of work completed. This can include background information obtained by reading the literature, details about a technique learned, and/or data generated.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

12hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work, responsibility, data collection, following appropriate lab and university-mandated safety protocols, initiative, and overall enthusiasm for research.
Parker, Ian
Lab Contact:
Angelo Demuro
ademuro@uci.edu
(949) 824-7833
A CELL MOLEC NEUROBIO
Department: SOM - Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

We are applying advanced imagin methods (confocal, multi-photon and evanescent wave mivroscopy) to study intracelllular calcium signaling processes. Ion channels are mediate the functioning of all cells, including processes such as synaptic transmission and electrical excitation. Moreover, they are implicated in many disease such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's diseases, and Parkinson's, making them important targets for drug therapies. Our laboratory is currently involved in developing new imaging techniques that permit us to visualize the activity of individual ion channels in living cells _ something previously possible only by the electrophysiological patch-clamp technique. Positions are available for 2 students to be involved in different aspects of the project. (1) Expression of ion channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes . This will involve learning basic molecular biology techniques such as cell transformation, propagation, in-vitro transcription and gel electrophoresis. (2) Analysis of single channel activity using image analysis and graphing software.

Requirements to Participate

Sophomore (in exceptional cases) or Junior standing

Grade Point Average

3.2 (sometimes negotiable)

Time Commitment per Week

8-12 hrs/wk
PATEL, ROSHAN M N/A N/A
Pathak, Medha
Lab Contact:
Medha M. Pathak
medhap@uci.edu
949-824-6623
A NEURAL STEM CELLS
Department: Physiology & Biophysics
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291 Irvine Hall

Research Description

Mechanical forces powerfully modulate neural stem cell behavior, thus shaping development and repair of the nervous system. Our lab aims to understand at a molecular, cellular and organismal level, how mechanical forces are detected and transduced by cells. In answering this question, we focus on the mechanically-activated ion channel, Piezo1, which we previously showed to be important for neural stem cell mechano-regulation. Research in the lab utilizes a broad variety of approaches, ranging from techniques in stem cell biology, cell biology, ion channel biophysics, bioengineering and developmental biology.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment to 2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Grade Point Average

3.2

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Completion of assigned tasks, understanding of the project, communication skills, accuracy of laboratory recording keeping.
Pedersen, Irene
Lab Contact:
Irene Pedersen
imp@uci.edu
(949) 824-2587
A MIRS & DISEASE
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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3450 MCGAUGH HALL

Research Description

The recent discovery of microRNAs (miRs) has revolutionized our understanding of gene control. miRs are encoded by endogenous genes and regulate over half of all genes in mammalian cells. They regulate gene expression at the stages of translation and mRNA stability. Already there is evidence that specific miRs play key roles in controlling development, stem cell fates and differentiation, and mutations in human miR genes have been linked to oncogenic and other disease states. An important task is to unveil the functions of individual miRs, determine how the miRs themselves are regulated and elucidate their role in human diseases. The main focus of my laboratory is to investigate the role of specific miRs (identified from miR/amiR screens) in cancer- and Induces Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC)-development, and explore how to regulate/counteract such dysregulation in a diseased state. A second area of research interest of my laboratory is to elucidate miRs function as an anti-viral defense mechanism in humans
Phielipp, Nicolas
Lab Contact:
Jaclyn Alcazar
jralcaza@uci.edu
949-824-1114
B Brain Motor Control
Department: Neurology
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150 Med Surge 1

Research Description

Rationale: Parkinson disease is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer disease, affecting an estimated one million people in the United States. Its prevalence is increasing in an aging population. Research over the last decade has shown that neuroprotective efforts to slow down or cure these diseases have been be “too little, too late” mainly because there are no serological or even clinical biomarkers to help diagnose this diseases at early stages. Specifically for Parkinson’s disease, there is a dire need to be able to predict progression in different phenotypes associated with different degrees of cognitive and/or motor impairments. Background and hypotheses: Previous research attempting to find clinical biomarkers has shown that Parkinson disease affects the ability to perform paced movements at frequencies above 2Hz (Stegemoller EL, et al.,2009a;Stegemoller EL, et al.,2009b). In this regard bradykinesia is the cardinal motor manifestation of parkinsonism. In addition a simple isometric motor task can help distinguish between Parkinson’s disease and Essential tremor (Poon C, et al.,2011) with high specificity and sensitivity. Regarding cognition Klassen BT et al found that slowness in the frequencies seen in background EEG can predict faster progression to cognitive impairment (Klassen BT, et al.,2011) and Nardone R et al found that short afferent inhibition (SAI) (a measure of cholinergic pathways), was reduced in patients who suffer from Rapid Eye Movement behavior disorder, which is considered a predictive clinical marker of faster progression to cognitive impairment (Nardone R, et al., 2013). In this setting clinical neurophysiology has already shown to be a useful tool to identify biomarkers. However the aforementioned studies included patients with moderate disease in which the clinical phenotype was already very distinct, enough to perform proper differential diagnoses. The novelty of our study is our focus on patients at early stages in which the clinical phenotype has not yet fulfilled definite clinical criteria for either Parkinson disease or its differential diagnoses such as Essential Tremor and idiopathic dystonia. Early diagnosis becomes essential for targeting specific therapies. So far in early cases, Dopamine Transporter (DaT) - Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is clinically used to assess dopaminergic denervation to help to differentiate between parkinsonism and other disorders (Stoessl AJ, et al 2014). We hypothesize that a multivariate better biomarker can be achieved via : 1) a simple motor task (single task) using speed and rhythmicity as sensitizing factors will help differentiate Parkinsonism from other groups; 2) a dual-task (cognitive and motor concurrent task) approach will increase the sensitivity and specificity of the test since dual tasking (performing a concurrent simple motor and cognitive task such as walking and talking) is impaired in parkinsonian patients (Broeder et al 2014); 3) correlating errors during simple motor and dual tasking with SAI, background EEG frequencies, and DaT-SPECT will confirm if these biomarkers are still valid at an early disease stage and if so to identify which combination or single test is the more sensitive and specific. Goal: we aim to identify and confirm the efficacy of simple clinical and neurophysiologic biomarkers of Parkinson’s disease at an early disease stage and will also identify which combination of these has the best sensitivity and specificity to diagnose Parkinson’s disease and predict different cognitive outcomes. The final aim for which these biomarkers are sought is to be able to identify which patients are the best candidates for different therapeutic interventions. Implementation plan: Subjects: will be recruited through our large movement disorders clinical program. We expect to recruit a total of 15 subjects, including 5 healthy age-matched controls. Inclusion criteria will be patients in which a DaT-SCAN has been obtained for clinical purposes. Study Visits: subjects will be studied in two time points, at time 0, and six months later. During each time point we will collect demographic data, EEG, SAI, brief cognitive screening, videotape clinical assessment, and EMG recordings of motor tasks (two blocks of 2.5 hours each time point). Data Analysis: Outcome measures will include increasing errors comparing the single and dual tasking. Errors will be correlated with slowness in background EEG frequency, reduced SAI, and clinical measures. Preprocessing of basic data will be followed by determination of sensitivity and specificity and receiver operating characteristics curves will be determined for each test alone and in combination. References Broeder S, et al. The effects of dual tasking in handwriting in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Neuroscience 2014; 263:193-202. Klassen BT, et al. Quantitative EEG as a predictive biomarker for Parkinson disease dementia

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20pts. Lab Work: 40pts. Communication: 20pts. Lab citizenship: 20pts.
Pigazzi, Alessio
Lab Contact:
Kathrina Munoz
katmunoz@uci.edu
(714) 456-5443
B COLON&REC SURGERY
Department: SOM - Surgery
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333 City Drive South Orange, Ca 92868

Research Description

Students will be exposed to colorectal surgery, minimally-invasive surgery and surgical endoscopy. Your experience will span the spectrum of clinical research. You might begin a project and help create a study based on recent research or assist in writing an IRB (institutional review board) proposal, enrolling patients in ongoing studies, data compilation or writing/presenting your research. Your experience as a research associate will be enhanced by being assigned to faculty and staff as liaisons for each project you work on. Monday afternoon research meetings will help to monitor progress as well as assist in furthering your research experience. Opportunities for publication and possibly presentation at local conferences are available.

Requirements to Participate

-sophomore standing -Monday evening availability (not always necessary) -Attend at least one clinic weekly -one to two year commitment -Four hours/unit/wk -Minimum of 2 units -Ability to work independently as well as in a group setting

Grade Point Average

3.25

Time Commitment per Week

Four hours/unit/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Work performance -Initiative -Quarterly research summary.
Piomelli, Daniele
Lab Contact:
Fariba Oveisi
foveisi@uci.edu
(949) 824-6180
A PHARMACOLOGY
Department: Anatomy & Neurobiology
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N/A

Research Description

The psychoactive effects of _9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major pharmacological ingredient of Cannabis sativa, are caused by the activation of G protein-coupled membrane receptors called cannabinoid receptors. The expression of these receptors __ abundant in brain structures involved in cognition, emotion and movement __ and the behavioral consequences of their activation __ ranging in man from euphoria to memory deficits __ underscore the potential importance of the endogenous signaling system by which these receptors are thought to be engaged. Yet, the biochemical nature, anatomical distribution and physiological functions of such signaling system remain largely unknown. Understanding the biochemistry and pharmacology of the body's own cannabinoid system is the major long-term objective of the research in our lab. To progress in this direction, we adopted two complementary approaches. On the one hand, we use biochemical and molecular biological techniques to study the mechanisms of formation and inactivation of endocannabinoid substances. On the other hand, we apply this biochemical information to design drugs that interfere with endocannabinoid metabolism. The development of pharmacological agents that prevent formation or inactivation of the endocannabinoids is essential to understand the physiological functions of these signaling molecules. Such drugs may not only prove to be useful experimental tools, but in light of the multiple behavioral effects of cannabinoid receptor activation might also open novel therapeutic avenues for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Requirements to Participate

Willingness to learn and excitement about science.

Time Commitment per Week

9-12 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work performed and participation.
Plikus, Maksim
Lab Contact:
Maksim Plikus
plikus@uci.edu
(949) 824-1260
A TISSUE REGENERATION
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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845 Health Science Road, Sue & Bill Gross Hall, #1205

Research Description

Plikus lab is investigating the regenerative potential of skin and the role of adult stem cells in wound healing. His laboratory is working to learn how activities of adult stem cells are regulated and how they can be directed to undergo embryonic-like regeneration events

Requirements to Participate

Attendance of lab meetings, Completion of assigned lab safety training COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 194S

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

12

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Quality of work and data collection, proper use of lab equipment, following appropriate lab and safety protocols, initiative and enthusiasm
Potkin, Steven
Lab Contact:
Jessica Turner
turnerj@uci.edu
(949) 824-3331
B PSYCHIATRY
Department: SOM - Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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N/A

Research Description

Current research involves numerous structural and functional MRI, PET, EEG and other imaging studies. Students will be involved in data collection, analysis and visualization, with weekly team meetings to discuss the current projects and interpret results. Looking for research students interested in learning more about brain imaging, brain function and dysfunction.

Grade Point Average

3
Poulos, Thomas
Lab Contact:
Thomas Poulos
A PROTEIN CRYSTALLOG
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Prescher, Jennifer
Lab Contact:
Jennifer Prescher
jpresche@uci.edu
(949) 824-1706
A CHEMICAL BIOLOGY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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3304 Natural Sciences I

Research Description

Imaging tools have revolutionized our understanding of living systems by enabling researchers to ?peer? into tissues and cells and visualize biological features in real time. While powerful, these probes have been largely confined to monitoring cellular behaviors on a microscopic level. Visualizing cellular interactions and functions across larger spatial scales'including those involved in cell migration to distant tissues, immunosurveillance, and other biological processes'remains a daunting task. The Prescher research group is developing general toolsets to image such macroscopic cellular networks and behaviors, and our efforts are focused in two areas: generating novel bioluminescent probes and developing new bioorthogonal chemistries for imaging in vivo.

Requirements to Participate

Attendance at weekly lab meetings and subgroup meetings, with an oral presentation once per quarter starting in the second quarter of enrollment. Submission of written summary of research progress at the end of each quarter. COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 97, 98, Chem 1A-C.

Grade Point Average

3.2 in Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences courses

Time Commitment per Week

4-5 hours per unit

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Effort, attendance and progress in research skills
Qiao, Feng
Lab Contact:
Feng Qiao
qiao@uci.edu
(949) 824-0159
A TELOMERE BIOLOGY
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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Hitachi 121 & 122.

Research Description

Telomeres & telomerase and their roles in cancer and stem cell diseases; Structural, biochemical and molecular genetic analyses of nucleoprotein assemblies Telomeres are closely involved in stem cell differentiation and cancer cell proliferation. Our long-term goal is to reveal new mechanisms for telomere length regulation and chromosome end protection. Therefore, valuable targets for mechanism-driven design of cancer and anti-aging therapeutics may be identified through our research. Specifically, we are interested in: ? Regulation of telomere homeostasis from atomic level to system level using the integration of biochemistry, structural biology (especially, x-ray crystallography), and genetics approaches. ? Re-engineering/re-wiring telomere regulatory pathways using synthetic biology modules and concepts. ? Chemical biology approach to identify small molecules that can inhibit telomere ON/OFF transition thereby inhibiting cancer cell progression

Requirements to Participate

Weekly Group meetings COURSE COMPLETION: 3-5 page research progress report.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

3-4 hours per unit

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Research Performance and Research Report.
Rafelski, Susanne
Lab Contact:
Susanne Rafelski
susanner@uci.edu
949-824-4888 but email strongly preferred.
A SYS BIO CELL ORG
Department: Developmental and Cell Biology
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3302 Natural Sciences I

Research Description

We are interested in the spatial and dynamic organization of the cell. Our model system currently is the study of mitochondrial networks in budding yeast. We take an interdisciplinary approach, combining 3D microscopy and image processing with molecular genetics and computational methods. Current research directions in the lab include 1) Quantifying mitochondrial networks in 3D – developing new computational tools to quantify mitochondrial morphology and dynamics, 2) Control of mitochondrial size – what are the mechanisms that regulate the proper amount of mitochondria in the cell, 3) Control of mitochondrial topology – what are the underlying principles that generate the connectivity of mitochondrial networks and how do fission and fusion dynamics contribute to this process, and 4) Bi-directional feedback between network morphology and mitochondrial function.

Requirements to Participate

Attendance at lab meetings and interactions with the research group. Interest in interdisciplinary, quantitative biology approaches.

Grade Point Average

3.5 or permission from the PI

Time Commitment per Week

Minimum 12/week or permission from the PI; Minimum 3 units or permission from the PI

What does it take to complete this course?

To be discussed with the PI; We are currently not accepting new students other than those already in the lab.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, effort and hard work, understanding of the research project and experiments/analysis techniques used.
Raffatellu, Manuela
Lab Contact:
Manuela Raffatellu
manuelar@uci.edu
(949) 824-0359
A SALMONELLA
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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C150 Med Sci I.

Research Description

The goal of our research is to understand how mucosal responses are orchestrated in response to mucosal pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium. The mucosal immune response has the important function of containing an infection and preventing dissemination of pathogens to systemic sites. However, there is increasing evidence that mucosal pathogens achieve greater colonization during inflammation. We are interested in investigating this dichotomy of the host response and understanding which responses constitute the mucosal barrier during S. typhimurium infection and which favor S. typhimurium colonization of the inflamed gut. Our 199 students will learn basic techniques in Microbiology, Bacterial Genetics, Immunology and Molecular Biology

Requirements to Participate

Bio 194S. OTHER: Student will be ask to participate to lab meetings and present their research progress at least once a year.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

15 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, Independence, Quality of Benchwork, Lab Book Maintenance, Presentation of results.
Ranz, Jose
Lab Contact:
Jose Ranz
jranz@uci.edu
(949) 824-9071
A GENOME EVOLUTION
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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465 Steinhaus Hall

Research Description

Two positions are offered. Our research interests lie at the interface of functional and evolutionary genomics using Drosophila as a model organism. In particular, we are interested in understanding how the molecular organization of the genome is shaped by functional constraints. We have identified a limited number of genomic regions where gene order has been preserved unexpectedly upon the multiple chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolutionary process. Those regions can encompass up to 50 genes. We have functionally analyzed those regions and found that they are often enriched for genes with similar functional properties. We are using genetic techniques of chromosomal engineering to disrupt those regions and to evaluate the effect of breaking those ultra-conserved regions of the genome using different genetic and molecular approaches. Specifically, we are performing molecular and physiological tests on individuals with both intact and disrupted regions, which will allow us to compare the gene expression and effects on fitness due to the disruption of those regions. Genomic DNA extraction, RNA extraction, PCR, RT-PCR, microarray experiments, tissue dissection, sequence analysis, data mining, and stock maintenance are the most relevant tasks associated with the projects described here.

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION Bio194S, Bio97, Bio99, and at least one among E106, D145, and D146 is advisable. OTHER: Students interested in performing research in our lab are encouraged to visit the lab prior to requesting a position (http://ranzlab.bio.uci.edu).

Grade Point Average

3.2

Time Commitment per Week

12 hrs

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Professionalism (enthusiasm, effort, attendance, high-quality work, team-work attitude) and quarterly research report
Rao, Uma
Lab Contact:
Betty Nguyen; Cristine Lam
bettyn1@uci.edu; cris.lam@uci.edu
949-824-4423; 949-824-4559
B BIOBEHAVIORAL RSRCH
Department: Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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URP, 5251 California Avenue, Suite 240, Irvine, CA

Research Description

Overarching aims of the research program are (1) to elucidate influential biological, behavioral and psychosocial factors related to child and adolescent behavioral/mental health conditions, and (2) to identify the underlying mechanisms of interventions/treatments for these conditions. Currently, three projects are funded by the National Institutes of Health through Year 2022. Project 1: The aim is to determine whether adolescents with depressive disorder and a history of childhood abuse have distinct differences in structural and functional neural circuits compared to depressed youth without childhood abuse. Four adolescent groups will be recruited: those with depression and abuse, those with depression but no abuse, those with no psychiatric disorder but have a history of abuse, and those with no disorder or abuse. They will undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to measure structural and functional connectivity profiles in key neural networks associated with the core symptoms of depression (fronto-limbic circuit for depressed mood; fronto-striatal circuit for anhedonia/inability to experience pleasure). If these two depression phenotypes (with/without abuse) have different neural circuitry changes, newer interventions can be developed and tested for the abuse phenotype which shows poor response to traditional treatment strategies. Project 2: Using a randomized controlled design, we will assess the neural substrates (via MRI scans) of risk-taking and risk-avoidant behavior before and after a 6-week computer-interactive, family-based intervention to reduce HIV-risk behaviors in 11-13-year-old African-American (Black) youth. Psychological processes shown to underlie the intervention effects (i.e. reward-drive and cognitive-emotional self-regulation) on behaviors that dissuade alcohol and drug use and sexual activity will be assessed at baseline and 3 months post-intervention. We will identify neural substrates associated with these psychological processes (i.e. reward-processing and cognitive-emotional self-regulation), and examine whether brain changes in these neural circuits in response to the intervention will predict risky behaviors 3 months later. This information will be helpful in refining the intervention for those who do not benefit from the program. Project 3: The aim is to examine the mechanisms linking race, stress and biobehavioral factors related to obesity in both natural and controlled environments in African-American (Black) and Non-Hispanic White (White) adolescent females. In the natural environment, we will measure cumulative stress in individual, family and social domains. We will assess the effects of stress on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis through sustained baseline cortisol (hair) and diurnal (24-hr) rhythm (saliva). In addition, we will measure food intake and physical activity for 7 days. We will manipulate acute stress in the lab and measure salivary cortisol/leptin responses to the stressor and compare food intake between non-stress and stress conditions. Also, we will measure obesity-related parameters including anthropometry, body composition (body fat and lean mass) and cardio-metabolic biomarkers. The findings will be helpful in developing more ethnically-sensitive interventions for obesity in minority youth who show poor response to traditional treatment strategies.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit 1 year Commitment

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Letter Grade Attendance: 20 points (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 50 points (quality, accuracy, integrated synthesis of information and safety) Communication: 10 points (oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor/assigned staff) Lab citizenship: 20 points (organization, clean-up and follow through Total: 100 points
Razorenova, Olga
Lab Contact:
Heather Wright
hjwright@uci.edu, olgar@uci.edu
(949) 824-3932/8156
A CANCER BIOLOGY
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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845 Health Sciences Rd Gross Hall #3001

Research Description

Laboratory research using methods of molecular and cell biology to investigate mechanisms of tumorigenesis

Requirements to Participate

Biology Major, strong interest in cancer biology.

Time Commitment per Week

20 hours+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance, hard work, understanding of theoretical basis of experiments conducted, experimental results
Rhee, Connie
Lab Contact:
Wei Ling Lau
wllau@uci.edu
714-456-5142
A NEPHROLOGY
Department: SOM Nephrology & Hypertension
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Med Sci C – C351

Research Description

Pathophysiology of renal disease and hypertension using cultured cells and rodent models of kidney disease and hypertension. Molecular, biological, and histological techniques.

Requirements to Participate

1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Grade Point Average

Flexible

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Observation of student participation and quality of work.
Ribbe, Markus
Lab Contact:
Markus Ribbe
A PROTEIN BIOCHEM
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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N/A
Rinehart, Joseph
Lab Contact:
Michael-David Calderon and Michael Ma
anesthresearch@uci.edu
714-456-5059
B ANESTHESIA OUTCOMES
Department: Anesthesiology
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Medical Center

Research Description

Our research analyzes clinical data of current and past surgical patients in order to aid us in making quality improvements in standard patient care, perioperative and postoperative outcomes. The collection of clinical data contributes to a better understanding of anesthesia practices and other factors that impact patient outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to have exposure to human subjects research and in-person recruitment. Projects will be conducted at UCI Medical Center.

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 2 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Enthusiasm of effort and completion of assigned work. Timely completion of hours and the presentation of relevant literature or Independent research projects.
Rose, Michael
Lab Contact:
Michael Rose
mrrose@uci.edu
(949) 824-8198
A BIOLOGY OF AGING
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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N/A

Research Description

Our lab uses experimental evolution and evolutionary physiology as approaches to address basic problems in biology. Fruit flies of the genus Drosophila are our experimental tool. Some of our research topics include the evolution and physiology of aging, cryonic preservation and resuscitation, reverse evolution, and evolutionary convergence in novel environments. We run a large lab in which undergrduates play a central role at every stage of the research process.

Requirements to Participate

Biology 96 or 106 with minimum grade of B, or Biology 94 with a minimum grade of A-. *All research students start as Bio. 198 group research students. Progress to Bio. 199 status depends on the student's abillity to work independently. NO student begins in the Bio. 199 course.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

10 hrs/wk to begin

Faculty Means of Evaluation

For 198: successful completion of hours, work assignments, and attendance at lab meetings; progress in understanding the scientfic background to the research. For 199: development of a successful research plan, execution of research plan, scientific understanding, completion of Excellence in Research requirements
SABAPATHY, THUSA N/A N/A
Said, Hamid
Lab Contact:
Hamid Said
hmsaid@uci.edu
(562) 826-5811
B MED GASTROENTRO
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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VA Medical Center, Long Beach

Research Description

To study vitamin nutrition in health and disease with specific focus on intestinal, colonic, pancreatic, hepatic, and renal uptake of the water-soluble vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B3, B9, and C. We have over 30 years experience in studying cellular/molecular aspects of vitamin transport into different cells, how genetic mutations in children affect the function of the particular vitamin transporter, how external/environmental factors like chronic alcohol consumption, chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, and exposure to certain intestinal pathogenic bacteria interfere with vitamin absorption and entry into cells, and how absorption processes of these vitamins are regulated at the cellular and molecular levels. We utilize state-of-the -art cellular and molecular approaches, as well as gene - knockout and knock in animal models in our investigations.

Requirements to Participate

Minimum 3 units. 14 to 16 hours per week for a year or two.

Grade Point Average

> 3.1

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance and contribution to the research investigations.
Sajjadi, Seyed Ahmad
Lab Contact:
S. Ahmad Sajjadi
ssajjadi@uci.edu
9498241485
B COGNITIVE NEUROLOGY
Department: Neurology
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Biological Sciences III

Research Description

My lab focuses on the early diagnosis and deep phenotyping of less typical forms of dementia with particular emphasis on degenerative language problems (aphasia). We use a combination of meticulous clinical and neuropsychological assessments (including spontaneous speech analysis) and novel MRI methods to diagnose and characterize these conditions.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit Minimum 2 units

Grade Point Average

3.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 25 points, Lab work: 40 points, Lab citizenship: 20 points, Journal club: 15 points
Sakai, Ann
Lab Contact:
Ann Sakai
aksakai@uci.edu
(949) 824-6581
A PLANT POP BIOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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UCI main campus greenhouse and laboratories, local field sites

Research Description

Flowering plants have a great diversity of breeding systems. Some species are hermaphroditic, others have females and hermaphrodites, and still others have only males and females. Our lab is interested in factors that promote these different breeding systems and the genetic potential of plants to evolve these different breeding systems. Understanding these processes provides information important in conservation, agriculture, and basic sciences. In a second line of research, our lab is also investigating factors that make non-native plants invasive in our local habitats. Undergraduates are directly involved in research and work closely with faculty and students in the greenhouse and laboratory on the rare Hawaiian genus Schiedea or in the field in local habitats invaded by fountain grass.

Requirements to Participate

Interest in ecology, conservation and/or evolution; prefer students with more than one year remaining at UCI COURSE COMPLETION: Bio 94 and 106 (completed or concurrent) with grade of B or better. OTHER: Students interested in the lab should first look at the following website http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=2693 and then send an email to Ann Sakai, indicating which aspects of the research are of greatest interest. Most of our students stay in the lab for at least two years and participate in the Excellence in Research program .

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

Variable but must be able to work on some weekend
Sandman, Curt
Lab Contact:
Megan Faulkner
megan.faulkner@uci.edu
(714) 628-2886
B PSYCHIATRY
Department: Psychiatry & Human Behavior
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544 N. Cypress St. Orange, CA 92866

Research Description

We are evaluating the consequences of prenatal exposure to stress and stress hormones for fetal, infant and child development in several NIH funded research protocols. Students working on this project will have the opportunity assist with data collection for several fun and interesting studies of child development. Prior experience working with children is preferred, but not required. We are looking for highly motivated students with an interest in medicine, psychology, biology, or public health, who are willing to work 10-15 hours/week for a minimum of 1 year. Responsibilities will include: administering assessments of child temperament, conducting standardized interviews, evaluating biological and psychosocial indicators of maternal and child stress, and database management. Training will be provided. Students should have access to transportation to and from the Medical Center.

Requirements to Participate

Transportation to and from the research site, minimum one year commitment, reliable, an interest in working with young children.

Time Commitment per Week

10-15 hours per week

Faculty Means of Evaluation

hours completed and quality of work completed.
Sandmeyer, Suzanne
Lab Contact:
Suzanne Sandmeyer
bsandme@uci.edu
(949) 824-7571
A FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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N/A

Research Description

Laboratory works on Ty3 which is a retrovirus like element in bakers yeast. Retroviruses are important because they are the causative agent of AIDS and because they are used as gene therapy vectors. They are unique in that they reverse transcribe an RNA genome into DNA and then integrate into the chromosomal DNA. The long term goal of this work is to identify homologues of proteins which are important for retrovirus replication in mammalian cells. These would be potential targets of antiretrovirus therapy.

Requirements to Participate

Science majors. Completion of introductory biology and general chemistry. Genetics, biochemistry or molecular biology lab experience preferred but not essential.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

Summer: 20 hours per week. Fall: 10-15 hours per week.
Sandri-goldin, Rozanne
Lab Contact:
Rozanne Sandri-goldin
rmsandri@uci.edu
(949) 824-7570
A VIRAL REGULATION
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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Medical Science I, RM. B280.

Research Description

The studies in my lab are focused on a multifunctional regulatory protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) termed ICP27. ICP27 is required for all stages of viral gene expression from transcription through RNA processing and export to translation. It performs these many functions by interacting with a number of cellular proteins and by binding viral RNA. ICP27 mediates the inhibition of host cell pre-mRNA splicing, which contributes to the shut-off of host protein synthesis. ICP27 recruits cellular RNA polymerase II to viral sites of transcription/replication to promote efficient viral transcription. ICP27 recruits cellular mRNA export proteins to viral transcription/replication sites to facilitate efficient viral RNA export. ICP27 itself binds viral RNA and directs it to the TAP/NXF1 mRNA export receptor and accompanies the mRNP through the nuclear pore complex to the cytoplasm, where it then recruits translation initiation factors to stimulate translation of viral transcripts. We are directing our studies toward defining the full composition of ICP27-multiprotein complexes required for successful viral replication and towards understanding how the interaction of ICP27 with these different complexes is regulated.

Requirements to Participate

Students interested in gene regulation and host-pathogen interactions. COURSE COMPLETION: Basic Molecular Biology and Chemistry

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12-15 hrs/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Literature search on the given topic, understanding general background and hypothesis, performance in laboratory techniques and procedures.
Sassone-corsi, Paolo
Lab Contact:
Paolo Sassone-corsi
psc@uci.edu
(949) 824-4540
A GENE EXPRESSION
Department: SOM - Biological Chemistry
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2115 Gillespie Neuroscience

Research Description

The focus of our research has been centered for many years on the mechanisms controlling gene expression. In particular we have explored how specific chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and epigenetic systems govern a number of physiological responses. At least two areas of research are of interest: 1) The circadian clock. 2) The differentiation of germ cells. 1. The Circadian Clock. All aspects of our physiology, including the biological rhythms of feeding, hormonal production, wake-sleep cycles, motorial activity etc are regulated by the circadian clock, a molecular pacemaker based on transcriptional autoregulatory loops. We have been exploring both the physiology and genetics of this system, and unraveled some of the most surprising and fascinating links with chromatin remodeling, cell cycle and metabolism (see for example Cell (2006) 125, 497-508). 2)The differentiation of germ cells. The generation of totipotent stem cells occurs through gametogenesis, a complex, sex-specific differentiation program (for an overview of our interests see Nature (2005) 434: 583-589). Germ cells have the unique capacity to start a new life upon fertilization. The mechanisms of gene regulation in germ cells are highly specialized, and we have identified a number of unique molecular devices that germ cells utilize to elicit a fine control of pre- and post-meiotic transcription. In addition, unique epigenetic modifications exist in germ cells, including a remarkable set of germ cell-specific histone variants and a highly specialized use of DNA-methylation. Their function in chromatin remodeling, meiosis and gene expression is crucial. In the male, the haploid germ cells undergo the spectacular histone-to-protamine transition process which reshapes the nucleus and prepares it for fertilization. The epigenetic control of these processes has a number of outstanding features and its comprehension is likely to have far-reaching implications for human health and reproduction. The unraveling of the regulatory pathways and molecular mechanisms that govern the differentiation program of germ cells is likely to provide essential hints to the biology of stem cells of non-germinal origin. In particular, our studies have identified highly specialized pathways for the control of RNA processing which determine the timing of the differentiation steps leading to germ cells maturation.

Requirements to Participate

High quality students with optimal scientific knowledge will be selected for their drive and enthusiasm. Interest at working at the bench and natural sense for experimentation are essential. Selection criteria: Resume and interview.

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12
Sato, Brian
Lab Contact:
Brian Sato
bsato@uci.edu
949-824-0661
A BIO ED RESEARCH
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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2238 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

Biology education research. What do Bio Sci students know? In order to answer this question, or to improve the learning experience, it is essential that experiments are designed and data is collected in a rigorous manner, similar to research conducted at the bench. My aim is to make my classroom a laboratory, to determine whether various aspects of the curriculum aid in student learning. Students working with me will get experience in experimental design, creation of data collection instruments, data analysis, and scientific writing. While this is a different side of biology research, the skills learned will be applicable to any field.

Requirements to Participate

Excellent communication skills (asking questions, responding to emails in a timely manner), independence, initiative

Grade Point Average

3.0

Time Commitment per Week

3 hours per unit, 3-5 units per quarter

What does it take to complete this course?

Weekly meetings with the PI and other students, independent work to be conducted on your own time.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Written progress reports, completion of assignments to be discussed at weekly meetings
Schilling, Thomas
Lab Contact:
Thomas Schilling
N/A
A VERTEBRAE GENETICS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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N/A
Seiler, Magdalene
Lab Contact:
Magdalene Seiler
mseiler@uci.edu
949-824-3265
A RETINAL REPAIR
Department: Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
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1101 Gross Hall

Research Description

There is currently no effective treatment for blinding diseases such as dry age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Both these diseases are characterized by a deficiency in photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. Therefore, our lab has pioneered a unique method to transplant fetal retinal progenitor sheets together with its supporting retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to replace the deficient retinal layers. The resulting surgical intervention and transplantation has been shown to improve vision in animal models of retinal degeneration as well as in patients with retinal degeneration. However, ethical considerations and the limited supply of fetal retinal tissue prevent this from being a feasible treatment. Recently, several laboratories have shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can “self-assembly” into early stages of eye development and develop into structures resembling retinal epithelia. To circumvent the limitations of fetal retinal tissue, our lab has generated 3-D constructs of retinal progenitor tissue from hESCs. In order to examine the effectiveness of the hESC-derived tissue as a treatment we will use an immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration. This rat model will allow for the integration of the transplanted hESC tissue without transplant rejection while concurrently permitting observation of the transplant integration in a model of retinal degeneration. The hypothesis of the proposed project is that hESC-derived retinal tissue can restore visual responses after transplantation into the immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration. Transplants will be followed by optical coherence imaging. Visual responses following implantation will be evaluated using optokinetic testing, electroretinograms, and superior colliculus electrophysiology. This project will ultimately help to restore vision in patients suffering from retinal diseases.

Requirements to Participate

Course syllabus: https://scout.eee.uci.edu/files/3026/Seiler%20Bio199%20course%20retinal%20repair%2012-24-15.pdf

Grade Point Average

2.8

Time Commitment per Week

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety) Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor) Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through) Total: 100 points.
Semler, Bert
Lab Contact:
Bert Semler
blsemler@uci.edu
A VIROLOGY
Department: Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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TBA
Sender, Leonard
Lab Contact:
Leonard Sender
lsender@uci.edu
(714) 456-8025
B AYA CANCER
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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UC Irvine Medical Center.

Research Description

Comprehensive investigation of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients (ages 15 to 39 years). Utilizes a multidisciplinary approach including: epidemiological components (incidence, prevalence, root causes); biological factors (genetic or cellular differences); the psychosocial impact of disease in the population; long-term cancer survivorship including fertility preservation; and service delivery. The inclusive research vision incorporates research from social ecology to address psychosocial difficulties, law and public health to deal with and correct current health policy and education, epidemiology to investigate the role of environmental influences, and biomedical ethics to concentrate on long-term effects of cancer therapy in adolescents and young adults.

Requirements to Participate

Students must be in their junior or senior year at UC Irvine, in good standing with the University and the School of Biological Sciences, and have, at a minimum, a 3.5 GPA. Students will need to submit a resume, a writing sample, and a statement of interest prior to being considered for a position. Academic interests should match one or more of the research goals of the clinical faculty member. Students should be prepared to participate 3-4 hours for each enrolled unit of Bio 199. Students should be willing and able to work independently on assigned tasks and be able to manage multiple assignments at one time while meeting defined deadlines. Successful candidates should demonstrate a willingness to learn and incorporate methods from other disciplines into their investigation of AYA cancer. Work location may vary. Students must have reliable transportation as meetings with Dr. Sender are often scheduled in his academic office at UC Irvine Medical Center.

Grade Point Average

3.50, Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis.

Time Commitment per Week

Students should be prepared to participate 3-4 hours for each enrolled unit of Bio 199.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Research presentation and/or publication at the end of each quarter, participation in lab meetings, commitment, and professionalism.
Senear, Donald
Lab Contact:
Donald Senear
dfsenear@uci.edu
(949) 824-8014
A PROT/DNA REG ASSEMB
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry
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MH 3206.

Research Description

Research in the lab focuses on the self-assembly of regulatory protein-DNA complexes in transcription and the control of gene expression. Students will conduct a range of experiments from biophysical analysis of protein structure and dynamics, and protein-DNA interactions to determination of levels of regulated mRNA's in vivo.

Requirements to Participate

Prefer starting in third year. Preference for students majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology.COURSE COMPLETION: Completion of Bio 99 though have accepted as concurrent

Grade Point Average

3.0+

Time Commitment per Week

15 hrs; typically 3 half days per week plus occasionally will be necessary to blend all day experiments with other activities.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Enthusiasm and commitment of the student; quality of the work completed; end of the qtr report.
Shaffer, Justin
Lab Contact:
Justin Shaffer
j.shaffer@uci.edu
949-824-2801
A Biology Education
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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4234 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

My research studies the best ways to teach undergraduate science classes and attempts to figure out how students learn scientific knowledge and develop scientific literacy skills. You will be assisting with searching and reviewing the scientific literature, analyzing scientific papers, and analyzing data from non-majors science courses, introductory biology courses, and/or human anatomy courses

Requirements to Participate

A motivation and interest to perform education research. Experience with Excel is useful but not essential.

Grade Point Average

3.0 or higher

Time Commitment per Week

Flexible, depending on the number of units, but most likely in the range of 3 to 6 hours per week.
SHAH, SHALINI S N/A N/A
Shi, Youngsheng
Lab Contact:
Youngsheng Shi
yongshes@uci.edu
(949) 824-0397
A MICROBIOL & MOL GEN
Department: SOM - Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
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C135C, Medical Sciences I.

Research Description

All eukaryotic mRNA precursors must go through multiple RNA processing steps in the nucleus, including capping, splicing, and 3?-end processing, before being exported to the cytoplasm as mature mRNAs. These mRNA processing steps plays critical roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Additionally, alternative mRNA processing is a major mechanism for expanding protein diversity in metazoans. However, the molecular mechanism and regulation of mRNA processing remain poorly understood. The research project will focus on elucidate the fundamental mechanisms mRNA 3? processing of our lab is mRNA 3? end processing (cleavage/polyadenylation) by using a combination of genomic, proteomic, biochemical, and bioinformatic approaches

Requirements to Participate

COURSE COMPLETION: Biochemistry

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

10

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Research progress, dedication, and effort.
SINGH, KATHRYN ELAINE N/A N/A
Siryaporn, Albert
Lab Contact:
Albert Siryaporn
asirya@uci.edu
A BACTERIAL GENETICS
Department: Molecular Biology & Biochemistry; Physics
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Reines Hall Rm. 1118

Research Description

My lab explores how bacterial sense and respond to mechanical forces in natural environments, biofilms, and infection settings. We use approaches from microbiology, molecular biology, genetics, biophysics, microfluidics, and computational modeling to explore the fundamental questions: 1. What is the effect of mechanical forces on bacterial physiology, 2. How do bacteria detect and transduce mechanical signals, and 3. How do mechanical forces affect population-level behaviors such as biofilm development and pathogenesis? Students should have knowledge of genetics and biochemistry and have strong analytical and quantitative skills. Students are expected to learn molecular biology and bacterial genetic techniques and conduct independent laboratory experiments. In addition, students must contribute to routine laboratory chores, schedule and attend meetings with the instructor, and participate in weekly lab meetings.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. Minimum 4 units. 1 year minimum Commitment. Commitment: 12-15 hours per week, Students are expected to attend lab full time during the summer quarter.

Grade Point Average

3.0

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grading: Attendance: 20Pts (working assigned hours, being on time) Lab Work: 40Pts (quality, accuracy, integrated.synthesis of information and safety) Communication: 20Pts (Written/Oral reports, questions and discussion with mentor) Lab citizenship: 20Pts (organization, clean up and follow through) Total: 100 points
Small, Steven
Lab Contact:
Steven Small
small@uci.edu
(949) 824-8944
B LANGUAGE CIRCUITS
Department: SOM - Neurology
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Bio Sci III Room 3226.

Research Description

Brain Circuits Research in the Brain Circuits Laboratory aims to characterize the neural network interactions that produce behavior, to understand the nature of their degradation in disease, and to develop biologically robust treatments. A major emphasis concerns the biological basis of human performance. Specifically, we use the techniques of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), stuctural MRI, Electroencephalography (EEG), univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, mathematical and computational modeling, and behavioral assessment.

Requirements to Participate

Must be highly motivated and interested in the neurobiology of language and in basic scientific research with human participants. Must have mathematical and/or computational coursework, experience, or strong interest. Must be able to attend weekly laboratory meetings.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

6 or more

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grade will be based on effort, participation, responsibility, and quality of work.
Solodkin, Ana
Lab Contact:
Ana Solodkin
solodkin@uci.edu
949-824-1480
B Neurobiomarkers
Department: Anatomy & Neurobiology and Neurology
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Hewitt Hall

Research Description

My research work focused on translational neuroscience, deals with the development of biomarkers for disease severity and recovery. The methods used are based on MRI and TMS. I study brain plasticity in 2 clinical models: motor stroke and neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s disease and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias). My laboratory targets plastic changes that may have therapeutic value for recovery and describe those changes through the determination of brain connectivity. The environment of the lab can be an enriching experience for students interested in translational studies for the following reasons: • Imaging: I have worked and published using different acquisitions, from structural T1 or T2 weighted images, to fMRI (evoked and at rest) and DTI. These studies have always been in the context of behavioral changes and/or disease progression and severity. • Network analysis: I have used and developed new strategies for network analysis to facilitate the assessment of intrinsic functional connectivity in disease. Likewise, I have used effective connectivity methodology to assess its relationship to changes in neurological disease. • Earlier work in human basic anatomy gives me an advantage for performing MRI-derived studies associated with Neurological changes. • All my studies are of a translational nature and are done in humans with different types of neurological deficits.
Soltesz, Ivan
Lab Contact:
Ivan Soltesz
A NEUROANATOMY RES
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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N/A
Sorkin, Dara
Lab Contact:
Dara Sorkin
B OBESITY PREVENTION
Department: SOM - Department of Medicine
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N/A
Sorte, Cascade
Lab Contact:
Cascade Sorte
csorte@uci.edu
949-824-6971
A MARINE ECOLOGY
Department: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
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TBA

Research Description

Research in the Sorte Lab is focused on the impacts of climate change in coastal marine systems. We explore the links between environmental conditions, physiology, species interactions, and biogeography in order to predict how community composition and species ranges are likely to change in the future. Student projects may include field studies in California coastal habitats, lab physiology or climate-change simulation experiments, meta-analysis of published data, or large-scale data synthesis.

Requirements to Participate

Students should be highly motivated and enthusiastic about marine ecology. A multi-quarter commitment is preferred. In addition to developing an independent project, all students are expected to participate in labwide projects (in order to gain breadth of experience), meetings, and reading groups. To apply for a position, please send an email detailing your interests and experience to csorte@uci.edu

Grade Point Average

2.8 and above preferred

Time Commitment per Week

8+ hours per week; 2-4 units

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Students are evaluated on work ethic, initiative, and attainment of research goals defined at the beginning of each term.
Stamos, Michael
Lab Contact:
Teresa Watters
twatters@uci.edu
(714) 456-6262
B CR SURGERY
Department: SOM - Surgery
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33 City Drive South Orange, Ca 92868

Research Description

Students will be exposed to colorectal surgery, minimally-invasive surgery and surgical endoscopy. Your experience will span the spectrum of clinical research. You might begin a project and help create a study based on recent research or assist in writing an IRB (institutional review board) proposal, enrolling patients in ongoing studies, data compilation or writing/presenting your research. Your experience as a research associate will be enhanced by being assigned to faculty and staff as liaisons for each project you work on. Wednesday afternoon research meetings will help to monitor progress as well as assist in furthering your research experience. Opportunities for publication and possibly presentation at local conferences are available.

Requirements to Participate

sophomore standing -Tuesday evening availability (not always necessary) -Attend at least one clinic weekly

Grade Point Average

3.25

Time Commitment per Week

Four hours/unit/wk

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Work performance, Initiative, Quarterly research summary
Stark, Craig
Lab Contact:
Craig Stark
cestark@uci.edu
(949) 824-4201
A COG NEURO OF MEMORY
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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Qureshey 213

Research Description

Research in my laboratory is concerned with the mechanisms that underlie memory. The central question guiding research in my laboratory is, how is it that we learn and remember information such that our past experiences influence our behavior? Specifically, we use the techniques of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), traditional experimental psychology, neuropsychological studies of amnesic patients, and studies of age-related memory changes to determine how the neural systems supporting these various types of memory operate and interact

Requirements to Participate

Must be highly motivated and interested in the cognitive neuroscience of memory and in research with human participants.

Grade Point Average

3.3

Time Commitment per Week

6+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grade will be based on effort, participation, responsibility, and quality of work
Steele, Robert
Lab Contact:
Rob Steele
resteele@uci.edu
949-824-7341
A EVOL & DEVELOPMENT
Department: Biological Chemistry
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C228, Medical Sciences I

Research Description

Positions are available for students to work on a project funded by the Biological Control Program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The project is entitled “Breaking the code: engineering neural controllers in Hydra”. The project is being carried out by a consortium of seven laboratories at five institutions in the United States. The goal of the project is to build synthetic behavior in the simple animal Hydra by genetically re-engineering its nervous system.

Requirements to Participate

3 - 4 hours per unit. 1 year Commitment. Minimum 3 units. Applicants must have completed Bio Sci 93. Enrollment in upper division course(s) preferred.

Grade Point Average

3.5

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance: 20 Pts (working assigned hours, being on time). Lab Work: 40 Pts (quality, accuracy, motivation, creativity). Communication: 20 Pts (written/ral reports, discussions with mentor). Lab citizenship: 20 Pts (organization, clean up, follow through). Total: 100 points
STEFFAN, JOAN S N/A N/A
Steward, Oswald
Lab Contact:
Oswald Steward
A ANATOMY
Department: SOM - Anatomy & Neurobiology
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N/A
STREJA, ELANI N/A N/A
Striedter, Georg
Lab Contact:
Georg Striedter
A NEURAL CONTROL BEH
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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N/A
Su, Lydia
Lab Contact:
Lydia Su
A MED-IMAGE ANALYSIS
Department: SOM - Radiological Sciences
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N/A
Subramanian, Veedamali
Lab Contact:
Veedamali S. Subramanian Ph.D
vsubrama@uci.edu
562-826-5803
B VITAMIN TRANSPORT
Department: Medicine
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VA Medical Center, Long Beach

Research Description

The research is primarily focused on studies related to the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the absorption and regulation of the water-soluble vitamin transporters in the human intestinal, renal, liver and other epithelial cells. We also examine the effect of chronic alcohol consumption and nicotine, genetic defects in the transport proteins, drug-interactions, protein-protein interactions and effect of dietary factors on vitamin transport processes. Our laboratory is funded by the NIH. Direct involvement of the students in the research projects is expected.

Grade Point Average

N/A

Time Commitment per Week

2 year commitment. Minimum 3 units.

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Attendance 20Pts Lab Work 50Pts Communication 10Pts Lab citizenship 20Pts
Suetterlin, Christine
Lab Contact:
Christine Suetterlin
suetterc@uci.edu
(949) 824-7140
A GOLGI DYNAMICS
Department: Developmental & Cell Biology
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4150 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

We study the regulation of the centrosome in mammalian tissue culture cells. This organelle is a small, non-membrane bound structure, which is critical for the organization of microtubules during interphase and mitosis. Abnormalities of the centrosome are found in most human cancers and are thought to cause defects in chromosome segregation and to lead to genetic instability. We are particularly interested in a signaling pathway by which Golgi proteins control the organization and function of this organelle. We also examine how this organelle is assembled and how its protein composition is controlled during the cell cycle. In addition, we are interested in determining how the intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis induces abnormalities of the centrosome. This unique interaction of the bacterium with its host cell may provide a mechanism that links this common pathogen to the development of cervical cancer

Requirements to Participate

Interest and enthusiasm in cell biology and host pathogen interactions highly motivated sophomore and juniors. COURSE COMPLETION: complete course list and grades should be sent to suetterc@uci.edu

Grade Point Average

3.5

Time Commitment per Week

15 hours in 3-5 hour blocks
Sumikawa, Katumi
Lab Contact:
Katumi Sumikawa
ksumikaw@uci.edu
(949) 824-5310
A CELLULAR MOLECULAR
Department: Neurobiology & Behavior
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1244 McGaugh Hall

Research Description

We study the role of nicotine receptors in cognitive function. Students will be able to learn more about cell and molecular biology in the neurosciences. They can practice techniques such as in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, etc.

Requirements to Participate

2nd or 3rd year students preferred,Completion of Bio. 93

Grade Point Average

3

Time Commitment per Week

12+

Faculty Means of Evaluation

Grades will be based on the quality of work.
Sumikawa, Katumi
Lab Contact:
not available
N/A
A CELL MOLEC NEUROBIO
Department: n/a
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see the other Sumikawa listing
Sun, Sha
Lab Contact:
Sha Sun
shasun@uci.edu
(949) 824-3673
A MOL CELL&GENETICS
Department: Developmental and Cell Biology
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McGaugh Hall 4401

Research Description

The main focus of our research involves the functi